Friendly Folio - The second Part of Henry the Sixt

The second Part of Henry the Sixt is a history written by William Shakespeare...

Parts / Sides in 'The second Part of Henry the Sixt':

250+ Lines:
Cade
Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)
King Henry (VI)
Queene Margaret
Suffolke
Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)
Less Than 250 Lines:
Armorer (Horner)
Beadle
Bevis
Brother (Stafford)
Buckingham
Bullingbrooke
Butcher (Dicke)
Cade Messenger
Cardinal Beauford (Winchester)
Clearke
Clifford
Commoner
Edward
Elianor
First Citizen
First Gentleman
First Murderer
First Neighbor
First Petitioner
First Prentice
Herald
Holland (John)
Hume
Iden
King Messenger
Lieutenant
Master
Mate
Mathew Goffe
Mayor (of St Albans)
Michael
One
Peter
Poste
Richard
Salisbury
Sawyer
Say
Scales
Second Citizen
Second Gentleman
Second Murderer
Second Neighbor
Second Petitioner
Second Prentice
Servant
Sherife
Simpcoxe
Soldier
Somerset
Southwell
Spirit (Asmath)
Stafford
Stanley (Sir John)
Third Neighbor
Vaux
Warwicke
Weaver (Smith)
Whitmore
Wife (Simpcoxe)
Witch (Jordane)
Young Clifford

Speeches:

Code Character Lines First Line  
G-810 Young Clifford35 Shame and Confusion all is on the rout,
(NULL)
M-810 Cade23 (prose) Well, hee shall be beheaded for it ten times:
(I am the Beesome that must sweepe the Court cleane of such filth as thou art:)
M-811 Clifford27 What say ye Countrimen, will ye relent
(Is Cade the sonne of Henry the fift,)
M-812 Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)30 Ah gracious Lord, these dayes are dangerous:
(Vertue is choakt with foule Ambition,)
M-813 Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)29 Brave Peeres of England, Pillars of the State,
(To you Duke Humfrey must unload his greefe:)
M-814 Hume21 Hume must make merry with the Duchesse Gold:
(Dame Elianor gives Gold, to bring the Witch:)
M-815 King Henry (VI)25 I Margaret: my heart is drown'd with griefe,
(NULL)
M-816 King Henry (VI)17 What, doth my Lord of Suffolke comfort me?
(NULL)
M-817 Lieutenant34 Poole, Sir Poole? Lord,
(Now will I dam up this thy yawning mouth,)
M-818 Salisbury25 Pride went before, Ambition followes him.
(Warwicke my sonne, the comfort of my age,)
M-819 Salisbury28 Sirs stand apart, the King shall know your minde.
(NULL)
M-820 Say28 Heare me but speake, and beare mee wher’e you will:
(Tell me: wherein have I offended most?)
M-821 Suffolke26 A plague upon them: wherefore should I cursse them?
(NULL)
M-822 Suffolke25 Thus is poore Suffolke ten times banished,
(If I depart from thee, I cannot live,)
M-823 Warwicke24 As surely as my soule intends to live
(I do beleeve that violent hands/See how the blood is setled in his face.)
M-824 Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)46 Anjou and Maine are given to the French,
(A day will come, when Yorke shall claime his owne,)
M-825 Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)19 How now? is Somerset at libertie?
(False King, why hast thou broken faith with me,)
M-826 Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)24 Now Yorke, or never, steele thy fearfull thoughts,
(NULL)
M-827 Young Clifford35 Shame and Confusion all is on the rout,
(NULL)
W-810 Elianor38 Come you, my Lord, to see my open shame?
(Ah Gloster, teach me to forget my selfe:)
W-811 Elianor27 Why droopes my Lord like over-ripen'd Corn,
(NULL)
W-812 Queene Margaret49 Be woe for me, more wretched then he is.
(NULL)
W-813 Queene Margaret17 Beside the haughtie Protector, have we Beauford
(As that prowd Dame, the Lord Protectors Wife:)
W-814 Queene Margaret38 Can you not see? Or will ye not observe
(NULL)
W-815 Queene Margaret22 Enough sweet Suffolke, thou torment’st thy selfe,
(Oh, let me intreat thee cease, give me thy hand,)
W-816 Queene Margaret23 My Lord of Suffolke, say, is this the guise?
(NULL)