Friendly Folio - Speeches

Together with your order we will also send you, free of charge, our famous five-page 20 Acting Clues We have assembled over 700 speeches suitable for auditions and scene study work. You can view them by play, character, or first line. It is quickest to go to the Play you know your speech is in, but you can also use the search feature to find a character by name, or a particular word in the first line. Because Friendly Folio uses the original spelling, use ONE word in your search, trying alternative Elizabethan spellings if necessary. Click on the Select button by the Speech you are interested in, and it will be put into your Basket.

Cost: Each Speech (usually 1 page) costs £1, and together with your order we will also send you, free of charge, our famous five-page 20 Acting Clues which offers tips on acting from the Folio. We accept either PayPal or credit card.

We have assembled 600 speeches suitable for auditions and scene study work. You can view them by play, character, or first line. You can use the search feature to find a character by name, or a particular word in the first line. Click on the the Select button by the speech you are interested in, and it will be put into your Basket.

Cost: Each Speech (usually 1 page) costs £1. We accept either PayPal or credit card.

Please note: Speeches can be sent by post printed in a suitable font on marbled paper, as Collectables.

More about Speeches

Each speech has a unique number, preceded by M- (for a man), W- (for a women), and G- (for a speech that can be used by either sex). The total number of lines in the speech is given, and it indicates when the speech is in prose. The first line of the speech is noted, and if there is a significant line in the speech, or if the usual starting point is not at the very beginning, then that is noted below the first line in brackets and in smaller typeface.

Browsing the speeches

If you know the play and character from which your speech is taken, then go to the play and character, and look through the speeches associated with it. Remember to look at the line in brackets below the first line, in case that is what you are looking for. You can also use the search facility, and by typing in the name of the character or of a particular word in the first line, find what you are looking for.

You can also sort the speeches by Code: the G-, M-, and W- (looking for a specific type of speech - this is how you can find all the uni-sex speeches prefixed G-); sort them by Character (looking for a particular name); or sort by first line, to see what is available for you.

If you want to see all the speeches that we have from a particular play, then clicking on the play title will show you all that we have for that title.

General speeches

There is no reason for you to limit yourself to a man's or woman's speech according to your own sex, so if you wish to extend your choice then there are some general speeches (G-) that can be done by either sex. We have also included those parts that would have been played by youths in Shakespeare's day, and these appear both as a man's and as a general speech, which is why we have the same speech with two different Code letters.

Famous lines

Sometimes a well known line is not the start of the speech. In these cases, and to help you find interesting speeches, we have marked both the first and the significant line, printed in brackets and in smaller typeface. When looking for your speech, use the Search tool on the Speeches page to find the speech or speeches containing the specific word (and remember that Elizabethan spelling can sometimes vary from that used today).

Timings

If you are unsure how long each speech will run, bear in mind that 10 lines will run for between 30 and 40 seconds when fully acted out. We have sometimes joined several speeches together to make it more useful to you, and when this is done we have included just the cue words before the next speech (just like the way Parts would have been laid out when using Original Practices).

Can't find a speech?

If you find that the speech (or collection of shorter speeches) that you want is not listed, then a special request to us (telling us a line from a speech, and how many lines you are interested in) will get you a Friendly Folio version for no extra charge.

Code Play Character Lines First Line  
Comedy
M-100 All's Well, that Ends Well Bertram19 My wife my Leige? I shal beseech your highnes
(Pardon my gracious Lord: for I submit)
M-101 All's Well, that Ends Well Bertram24 They told me that your name was Fontybell.
(But give thy selfe unto my sicke desires,)
M-102 All's Well, that Ends Well Clowne (Lavatch)32 (prose) I have beene Madam a wicked creature, as you
(Y'are shallow Madam in great friends, for the)
M-103 All's Well, that Ends Well King (of France)25 I would I had that corporall soundnesse now,
(NULL)
M-104 All's Well, that Ends Well King (of France)28 Tis onely title thou disdainst in her, the which
(NULL)
M-105 All's Well, that Ends Well Parrolles28 (prose) Ten a clocke: Within these three houres ’twill
(What the divell should move mee to undertake)
M-106 All's Well, that Ends Well Parrolles27 (prose) There is none: Man setting downe before you,
(Virginity beeing blowne downe, Man will)
W-100 All's Well, that Ends Well Countesse23 Ah what sharpe stings are in her mildest words?
(What Angell shall; My heart is heavie, and mine age is weake,)
W-101 All's Well, that Ends Well Countesse19 Yes Hellen, you might be my daughter in law,
(NULL)
W-102 All's Well, that Ends Well Countesse34 You know Hellen I am a mother to you.
(Nay a mother, why not a mother? when I sed a mother)
W-103 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena25 Inspired Merit so by breath is bard,
(NULL)
W-104 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena20 O were that all, I thinke not on my father,
(NULL)
W-105 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena14 Our remedies oft in our selves do lye,
(NULL)
W-106 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena26 Then I confesse,
(Here on my knee, before high heaven and you,)
W-107 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena31 Till I have no wife I have nothing in France.
(Who ever shoots at him, I set him there.)
G-120 As you Like it Le Beau22 Good Sir, I do in friendship counsaile you
(NULL)
G-121 As you Like it Second Brother16 Let me have audience for a word or two:
(NULL)
M-120 As you Like it Clowne (Touchstone)29 (prose) Upon a lye, seven times removed: (beare your
(NULL)
M-121 As you Like it Duke Senior17 Now my Coe-mates, and brothers in exile:
(NULL)
M-122 As you Like it First Forrest Lord38 Indeed my Lord The melancholy Jaques grieves at that,
(NULL)
M-123 As you Like it Jaques23 A Foole, a foole: I met a foole i'th Forrest,
(NULL)
M-124 As you Like it Jaques28 All the world's a stage,
(NULL)
M-125 As you Like it Jaques18 Why who cries out on pride,
(NULL)
M-126 As you Like it Le Beau22 Good Sir, I do in friendship counsaile you
(NULL)
M-127 As you Like it Oliver23 When last the yong Orlando parted from you,
(NULL)
M-128 As you Like it Orlando24 (prose) As I remember Adam, it was upon this fashion
(NULL)
M-129 As you Like it Orlando23 I almost die for food, and let me have it.
(NULL)
M-130 As you Like it Second Brother16 Let me have audience for a word or two:
(NULL)
M-131 As you Like it Silvius19 Oh Corin, that thou knew'st how I do love her.
(Thou hast not lov'd)
W-120 As you Like it Celia30 Why should this Desert bee, (poem)
(NULL)
W-121 As you Like it Phebe20 I would not be thy executioner,
(NULL)
W-122 As you Like it Phebe27 Thinke not I love him, though I ask for him,
(NULL)
W-123 As you Like it Rosalind18 Alas, what danger will it be to us,
(NULL)
W-124 As you Like it Rosalind29 And why I pray you? who might be your mother
(NULL)
W-125 As you Like it Rosalind21 (prose) It is not the fashion to see the Ladie the Epilogue:
(NULL)
W-126 As you Like it Rosalind14 (prose) No faith, die by Attorney: the poore world is
(NULL)
W-127 As you Like it Rosalind26 (prose) There is none of my Unckles markes upon you:
(NULL)
M-140 The Comedie of Errors Antipholus of Ephesus40 My Liege, I am advised what I say,
(NULL)
M-141 The Comedie of Errors Antipholus of Siracuse24 Sweete Mistris, what your name is else I know not;
(NULL)
M-142 The Comedie of Errors Antipholus of Siracuse11 There's not a man I meete but doth salute me
(NULL)
M-143 The Comedie of Errors Dromio of Siracuse47 (prose) Doe you know me sir? Am I Dromio? Am I
(Marry sir, she's the Kitchin wench, and al grease,)
M-144 The Comedie of Errors Dromio of Siracuse32 (prose) Doe you know me sir? Am I (Edited version)Dromio? Am I
(NULL)
M-145 The Comedie of Errors Father (Egeon)64 A heavier taske could not have beene impos’d,
(NULL)
M-146 The Comedie of Errors Father (Egeon)39 Oh had the gods done so, I had not now
(NULL)
W-140 The Comedie of Errors Abbesse (Æmilia)19 And thereof came it, that the man was mad.
(The venome clamors of a jealous woman,)
W-141 The Comedie of Errors Adriana37 I, I, Antipholus, looke strange and frowne,
(NULL)
W-142 The Comedie of Errors Adriana25 May it please your Grace, Antipholus my husband,
(NULL)
W-143 The Comedie of Errors Courtizan16 Now out of doubt Antipholus is mad,
(NULL)
W-144 The Comedie of Errors Luciana28 And may it be that you have quite forgot
(NULL)
M-160 Loves Labour's lost Armado18 (prose) I doe affect the very ground (which is base)
(NULL)
M-161 Loves Labour's lost Berowne39 But Love first learned in a Ladies eyes,
(NULL)
M-162 Loves Labour's lost Berowne24 Honest plain words, best pierce the ears of griefe
(NULL)
M-163 Loves Labour's lost Berowne23 Neither of either, I remit both twaine.
(I see the tricke on’t: Heere was a consent,)
M-164 Loves Labour's lost Berowne34 Now step I forth to whip hypocrisie.
(Not you by me, but I betrayed to you.)
M-165 Loves Labour's lost Berowne33 O, and I forsooth in love,
(NULL)
M-166 Loves Labour's lost Berowne39 O 'tis more then neede.
(Have at you then affections men at armes,)
M-167 Loves Labour's lost Berowne20 This fellow pickes up wit as Pigeons pease,
(He is Wits Pedler, and retailes his Wares,)
M-168 Loves Labour's lost Berowne22 Thus poure the stars down plagues for perjury.
(NULL)
M-169 Loves Labour's lost Berowne22 Why? all delights are vaine, and that most vaine
(NULL)
M-170 Loves Labour's lost Boyet20 If my observation (which very seldome lies
(Why all his behaviours doe make their retire,)
M-171 Loves Labour's lost Boyet30 Under the coole shade of a Siccamore,
(NULL)
M-172 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)20 Come sir, you blush: as his, your case is such,
(NULL)
M-173 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)23 Let Fame, that all hunt after in their lives,
(Our Court shall be a little Achademe,)
M-174 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)28 Madame, your father heere doth intimate,
(NULL)
M-175 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)21 (prose) So it is besieged with sable coloured melancholie, I (letter)
(NULL)
M-176 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)19 So sweete a kisse the golden Sunne gives not,
(NULL)
W-160 Loves Labour's lost Princesse25 A time me thinkes too short,
(NULL)
W-161 Loves Labour's lost Princesse22 Good Lord Boyet, my beauty though but mean,
(NULL)
W-162 Loves Labour's lost Rosaline26 Oft have I heard of you my Lord Berowne,
(NULL)
M-180 Measure, For Measure Angelo26 From thee: even from thy vertue.
(What's this? what's this? is this her fault, or mine?)
M-181 Measure, For Measure Angelo29 When I would pray, and think, I thinke, and pray
(NULL)
M-182 Measure, For Measure Angelo17 Who will beleeve thee Isabell?
(NULL)
M-183 Measure, For Measure Claudio19 I, but to die, and goe we know not where,
(NULL)
M-184 Measure, For Measure Duke (Vincentio)28 Be absolute for death: either death or life
(NULL)
M-185 Measure, For Measure Duke (Vincentio)19 Of Government, the properties to unfold,
(NULL)
M-186 Measure, For Measure Duke (Vincentio)38 So then you hope of pardon from Lord Angelo?
(Be absolute for death: either death or life)
M-187 Measure, For Measure Lucio26 This is the point.
(The Duke is very strangely gone from hence;)
W-180 Measure, For Measure Isabella27 Most strange: but yet most truely wil I speake,
(Oh Prince, I conjure thee, as thou beleev'st)
W-181 Measure, For Measure Isabella17 Oh you beast,
(NULL)
W-182 Measure, For Measure Isabella21 So you must be the first that gives this sentence,
(Could great men thunder)
W-183 Measure, For Measure Isabella17 To whom should I complaine? Did I tell this,
(NULL)
W-184 Measure, For Measure Isabella21 Too late? why no: I that doe speak a word
(NULL)
W-185 Measure, For Measure Mariana32 My Lord, I doe confesse I nere was married,
(NULL)
G-200 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)22 Marry well remembred,
(A kinder Gentleman treads not the earth,)
G-201 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)26 Your minde is tossing on the Ocean,
(My winde cooling my broth,)
M-200 The Merchant of Venice Anthonio18 But little: I am arm'd and well prepar'd.
(NULL)
M-201 The Merchant of Venice Anthonio19 I pray you thinke you question with the Jew:
(I am a tainted Weather of the flocke,)
M-202 The Merchant of Venice Arragon34 And so have I addrest me, fortune now
(NULL)
M-203 The Merchant of Venice Bassanio27 O sweet Portia,
(Heere are a few of the unpleasant'st words)
M-204 The Merchant of Venice Bassanio35 So may the outward showes be least themselves
(NULL)
M-205 The Merchant of Venice Clowne (Launcelet)28 (prose) Certainely, my conscience will serve me to run
(NULL)
M-206 The Merchant of Venice Gratiano26 Let me play the foole,
(There are a sort of men, whose visages)
M-207 The Merchant of Venice Lorenzo20 Let's in, and there expect their comming.
(How sweet the moone-light sleepes upon this banke,)
M-208 The Merchant of Venice Morrocho48 Some God direct my judgement, let me see,
(NULL)
M-209 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)22 Marry well remembred,
(A kinder Gentleman treads not the earth,)
M-210 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)26 Your minde is tossing on the Ocean,
(My winde cooling my broth,)
M-211 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke28 I have possest your grace of what I purpose,
(NULL)
M-212 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke18 If everie Ducat in sixe thousand Ducates
(What judgement shall I dread doing no wrong?)
M-213 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke23 Signior Anthonio, many a time and oft
(NULL)
M-214 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke19 (prose) To baite fish withall, if it will feede nothing
(Hath not a Jew eyes?)
W-200 The Merchant of Venice Portia23 Away then, I am lockt in one of them,
(NULL)
W-201 The Merchant of Venice Portia24 I pray you tarrie, pause a day or two
(NULL)
W-202 The Merchant of Venice Portia29 Is your name Shylocke?
(The quality of mercy is not strain'd,)
W-203 The Merchant of Venice Portia22 The quality of mercy is not strain'd,
(NULL)
W-204 The Merchant of Venice Portia24 What, no more?
(Pay him sixe thousand, and deface the bond:)
W-205 The Merchant of Venice Portia26 You see my Lord Bassiano where I stand,
(NULL)
M-220 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe18 (prose) Go, fetch me a quart of Sacke, put a tost in't.
(Come, let me poure in some Sack to the Thames water:)
M-221 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe15 (prose) I went to her (Master Broome) as you see, like a
(NULL)
M-222 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe34 (prose) Nay, you shall heare (Master Broome) what I
(NULL)
M-223 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe20 (prose) The Windsor-bell hath stroke twelve: the Minute
(For me, I am heere a Windsor Stagge,)
M-224 The Merry Wives of Windsor Fenton37 From time to time, I have acquainted you
(NULL)
M-225 The Merry Wives of Windsor Ford18 (prose) Has Page any braines? Hath he any eies? Hath he
(NULL)
M-226 The Merry Wives of Windsor Ford26 (prose) Sir, I heare you are a Scholler: (I will be briefe
(I have long lov’d her, and I protest to you, bestowed)
M-227 The Merry Wives of Windsor Ford25 (prose) What a damn'd Epicurian-Rascall is this? my
(NULL)
W-220 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Ford17 (prose) Wee burne day-light: heere, read, read:
(NULL)
W-221 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Page29 There is an old tale goes, that Herne the
(As Falstaffe, she, and I, are newly met,)
W-222 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Page25 (prose) What, have scap'd Love-letters in the
(NULL)
W-223 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Quickly31 Fairies blacke, gray, greene, and white,
(About, about: Search Windsor Castle (Elves) within, and out.)
W-224 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Quickly27 (prose) Marry this is the short, and the long of it: you
(Marry, she hath receiv’d your Letter: for the)
G-240 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)16 If we shadowes have offended,
(NULL)
G-241 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)29 My Mistris with a monster is in love,
(NULL)
G-242 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)20 Now the hungry Lyons rores,
(NULL)
G-243 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)31 The King doth keepe his Revels here to night,
(I am that merrie wanderer of the night:)
G-244 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)18 Through the Forrest have I gone,
(NULL)
M-240 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Bottome18 (prose) When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer.
(NULL)
M-241 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Demetrius17 My Lord, faire Helen told me of their stealth,
(NULL)
M-242 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Demetrius16 O Helen, goddesse, nimph, perfect, divine,
(NULL)
M-243 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Egeus24 Full of vexation, come I, with complaint
(NULL)
M-244 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Lysander20 A good perswasion; therefore heare me Hermia,
(Helen, to you our mindes we will unfold,)
M-245 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Lysander27 And run through fire I will for thy sweet sake.
(NULL)
M-246 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Oberon20 I pray thee give it me.
(I know a banke where the wilde time blowes,)
M-247 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Oberon29 Wel, go thy way: thou shalt not from this grove,
(My gentle Pucke come hither; thou remembrest)
M-248 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Oberon31 Welcome good Robin:
(NULL)
M-249 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Quince35 If we offend, it is with our good will.
(NULL)
M-250 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Theseus20 More strange then true. I never may beleeve
(Lovers and mad men have such seething braines,)
M-251 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Theseus17 The kinder we, to give them thanks for nothing
(NULL)
M-252 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Flute16 Asleepe my Love? What, dead my Dove?
(NULL)
W-240 A Midsommer Nights Dreame First Fairy23 Over hil, over dale, through bush, through briar,
(Either I mistake your shape and making quite,)
W-241 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena13 Cal you me faire? that faire againe unsay,
(NULL)
W-242 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena22 Have you not set Lysander, as in scorne
(I, doe, persever, counterfeit sad lookes,)
W-243 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena26 How happy some, ore other some can be?
(NULL)
W-244 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena19 I pray you though you mocke me, gentlemen,
(Good Hermia, do not be so bitter with me,)
W-245 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena28 Loe, she is one of this confederacy,
(NULL)
W-246 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena15 O I am out of breath, in this fond chace,
(NULL)
W-247 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena17 O spight! O hell! I see you are all bent
(NULL)
W-248 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena26 You draw me, you hard-hearted Adamant,
(The wildest hath not such a heart as you;)
W-249 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia12 Helpe me Lysander, helpe me; do thy best
(NULL)
W-250 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia23 Now I but chide, but I should use thee worse.
(Out dog, out cur, thou driv'st me past the bounds)
W-251 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia10 Puppet? why so? I, that way goes the game.
(NULL)
W-252 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia20 What, can you do me greater harme then hate?
(Puppet? why so? I, that way goes the game.)
W-253 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Titania26 Out of this wood, do not desire to goe,
(NULL)
W-254 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Titania17 Set your heart at rest,
(NULL)
W-255 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Titania37 These are the forgeries of jealousie,
(NULL)
M-260 Much adoe about Nothing Benedicke28 (prose) I know that, but I would have thee hence, and
(NULL)
M-261 Much adoe about Nothing Benedicke24 (prose) This can be no tricke, the conference was sadly
(NULL)
M-262 Much adoe about Nothing Claudio27 Sweet Prince, you learn me noble thankfulnes:
(Give not this rotten Orenge to your friend,)
M-263 Much adoe about Nothing Don Pedro18 Thou wilt be like a lover presently,
(What need the bridge much broder then the flood?)
M-264 Much adoe about Nothing Frier Francis15 Heare me a little, for I have onely bene silent so
(NULL)
M-265 Much adoe about Nothing Frier Francis43 Pause awhile:
(Marry this wel carried, shall on her behalfe,)
M-266 Much adoe about Nothing Leonato30 I pray thee cease thy counsaile,
(NULL)
M-267 Much adoe about Nothing Leonato24 Wherefore? Why doth not every earthly thing
(NULL)
W-260 Much adoe about Nothing Beatrice17 (prose) Is a not approved in the height a villaine, that
(Princes and Counties! surelie a Princely testi-)
W-261 Much adoe about Nothing Beatrice10 What fire is in mine eares? can this be true?
(NULL)
W-262 Much adoe about Nothing Margaret14 (prose) Get you some of this distill’d carduus benedictus
(NULL)
G-280 The Taming of the Shrew Biondello25 (prose) Why Petruchio is comming, in a new hat and
(NULL)
M-280 The Taming of the Shrew Biondello25 (prose) Why Petruchio is comming, in a new hat and
(NULL)
M-281 The Taming of the Shrew Gremio23 Tut, she's a Lambe, a Dove, a foole to him:
(NULL)
M-282 The Taming of the Shrew Lucentio23 Oh Tranio, till I found it to be true,
(I found the effect of Love in idlenesse)
M-283 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio20 Be patient gentlemen, I choose her for my selfe,
(And kisse me Kate, we will be married a sonday.)
M-284 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio18 They shall goe forward Kate at thy command,
(I will be master of what is mine owne,)
M-285 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio24 Thus have I politickely begun my reigne,
(NULL)
M-286 The Taming of the Shrew Tranio25 I pray sir tel me, is it possible
(Nay, then ’tis time to stirre him from his trance:)
W-280 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine25 Fie, fie, unknit that thretaning unkinde brow,
(NULL)
W-281 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine44 Fie, fie, unknit that thretaning unkinde brow, (Extended)
(NULL)
W-282 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine14 No shame but mine, I must forsooth be forst
(NULL)
W-283 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine25 The more my wrong, the more his spite appears.
(NULL)
G-300 Troylus and Cressida Prologue31 In Troy there lyes a Scene: From Isles of Greece
(NULL)
M-300 Troylus and Cressida Achilles20 What am I poore of late?
(NULL)
M-301 Troylus and Cressida Agamemnon27 Heare you Patroclus:
(If you doe say, we thinke him over proud,)
M-302 Troylus and Cressida Agamemnon30 Princes: What greefe hath set the Jaundies on your cheekes?
(NULL)
M-303 Troylus and Cressida Aeneas28 Trumpet blow loud,
(If there be one among’st the fayr’st of Greece,)
M-304 Troylus and Cressida Hector31 Paris and Troylus, you have both said well:
(If Helen then be wife to Sparta’s King)
M-305 Troylus and Cressida Hector20 Why then will I no more:
(Be drained. Let me embrace thee Ajax:)
M-306 Troylus and Cressida Nestor27 With due Observance of thy godly feat,
(How many shallow bauble Boates dare saile)
M-307 Troylus and Cressida Nestor24 Yes, ’tis most meet; who may you else oppose
(Yet in this triall, much opinion dwels.)
M-308 Troylus and Cressida Pandarus21 A goodly medecine, for mine aking bones: oh world,
(NULL)
M-309 Troylus and Cressida Thersites20 (prose) How now Thersites? what lost in the Labyrinth of thy
(NULL)
M-310 Troylus and Cressida Thersites18 (prose) With too much bloud, and too little Brain, these
(NULL)
M-311 Troylus and Cressida Troylus19 And sodainely, where injurie of chance
(Our lockt embrasures; strangles our deare vowes,)
M-312 Troylus and Cressida Troylus36 I take to day a Wife, and my election
(NULL)
M-313 Troylus and Cressida Troylus24 This she? no, this is Diomeds Cressida:
(NULL)
M-314 Troylus and Cressida Troylus20 You understand me not, that tell me so:
(Goe in to Troy, and say there, Hector’s dead:)
M-315 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses29 Give pardon to my speech:
(What glory our Achilles shares from Hector,)
M-316 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses30 I doe not straine it at the position,
(NULL)
M-317 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses64 Troy yet upon his basis has bene downe,
(Quite from their fixure? O, when Degree is shak’d,/This Chaos, when Degree is suffocate,)
M-318 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses45 Time hath (my Lord) a wallet at his backe,
(NULL)
M-319 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses43 The great Achilles, whom Opinion crownes,
(From his deepe Chest, laughes out a lowd applause,)
W-300 Troylus and Cressida Cressida24 Boldnesse comes to mee now, and brings mee
(Hard to seeme won: but I was won my Lord)
W-301 Troylus and Cressida Cressida15 By the same token, you are a Bawd.
(Words, vowes, gifts, teares, and loves full sacrifice,)
W-302 Troylus and Cressida Cressida20 Perchance my Lord, I shew more craft then love,
(If I be false, or swerve a haire from truth,)
G-320 Twelfe Night Sebastian24 (prose) By your patience, no: my starres shine darkely
(NULL)
G-321 Twelfe Night Sebastian21 This is the ayre, that is the glorious Sunne,
(NULL)
M-320 Twelfe Night Anthonio24 Orsino: Noble sir,
(NULL)
M-321 Twelfe Night Clowne (Feste)20 When that I was and a little tine boy, (song)
(NULL)
M-322 Twelfe Night Malvolio37 (prose) M,O,A,I. This simulation is not as the former:
(NULL)
M-323 Twelfe Night Malvolio17 Madam, you have done me wrong,
(Lady you have, pray you peruse that Letter.)
M-324 Twelfe Night Malvolio19 (prose) Oh ho, do you come neere me now: no worse
(NULL)
M-325 Twelfe Night Duke (Orsino)22 If Musicke be the food of Love, play on,
(NULL)
M-326 Twelfe Night Duke (Orsino)15 Why should I not, (had I the heart to do it
(NULL)
M-327 Twelfe Night Sebastian24 (prose) By your patience, no: my starres shine darkely
(NULL)
M-328 Twelfe Night Sebastian21 This is the ayre, that is the glorious Sunne,
(NULL)
M-329 Twelfe Night Sir Toby21 (prose) Go sir Andrew: scout mee for him at the corner
(Now will not I deliver his Letter: for the behaviour)
W-320 Twelfe Night Olivia18 O by your leave I pray you.
(Give me leave, beseech you: I did send,)
W-321 Twelfe Night Olivia30 O by your leave I pray you. (Extended)
(Give me leave, beseech you: I did send,/The clocke upbraides me with the waste of time:)
W-322 Twelfe Night Olivia12 O what a deale of scorne, lookes beautifull?
(NULL)
W-323 Twelfe Night Olivia22 What is your Parentage?
(Above my fortunes, yet my state is well;)
W-324 Twelfe Night Viola32 Good Madam, let me see your face.
(If I did love you in my masters flame)
W-325 Twelfe Night Viola25 I left no Ring with her: what meanes this Lady?
(NULL)
W-326 Twelfe Night Viola13 If I did love you in my masters flame
(Make me a Willow Cabine at your gate,)
W-327 Twelfe Night Viola15 There is a faire behaviour in thee Captaine,
(NULL)
G-340 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Speed22 (prose) Shee that your worship loves?
(Marry by these speciall markes: first, you have)
M-340 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Duke (of Milan)34 How shall I fashion me to weare a cloake?
(’Tis so: and heere’s the Ladder for the purpose.)
M-341 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Duke (of Milan)25 Nay then no matter: stay with me a while,
(No, trust me, She is peevish, sullen, froward,)
M-342 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Launce33 (prose) Nay, 'twill bee this howre ere I have done
(NULL)
M-343 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Launce37 (prose) When a mans servant shall play the Curre with
(NULL)
M-344 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus20 As much as I can doe, I will effect:
(Say that upon the altar of her beauty)
M-345 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus31 I, I: and she hath offered to the doome
(Cease to lament for that thou canst not helpe,)
M-346 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus24 I will. Even as one heate, another heate expels,
(NULL)
M-347 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus28 My gracious Lord, that which I wold discover,
(Know (noble Lord) they have devis’d a meane)
M-348 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus43 To leave my Julia; shall I be forsworne?
(NULL)
M-349 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Speed22 (prose) Shee that your worship loves?
(Marry by these speciall markes: first, you have)
M-350 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Valentine18 And why not death, rather then living torment?
(NULL)
M-351 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Valentine16 I Protheus, but that life is alter'd now,
(NULL)
M-352 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Valentine17 What would your Grace have me to do in this?
(Win her with gifts, if she respect not words,)
W-340 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia27 And she shall thanke you for't, if ere you know her.
(A vertuous gentlewoman, milde, and beautifull.)
W-341 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia18 How many women would doe such a message?
(NULL)
W-342 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia25 Now (by my modesty) a goodly Broker:
(And yet I would I had ore-look'd the Letter;)
W-343 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia21 Oh, know'st thou not, his looks are my soules food?
(The more thou dam'st it up, the more it burnes:)
W-344 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia23 She hath bin fairer (Madam) then she is,
(Therefore I know she is about my height,)
W-345 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia21 That is the least (Lucetta) of my feare:
(But truer starres did governe Protheus birth,)
W-346 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia30 This babble shall not henceforth trouble me;
(Oh hatefull hands, to teare such loving words;)
W-347 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Silvia17 Had I beene ceazed by a hungry Lion,
(When Protheus cannot love, where he’s belov’d:)
W-348 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Silvia26 Oh Eglamoure, thou art a Gentleman:
(NULL)
Tragedy
M-360 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony22 Ah, thou Spell! Avaunt.
(NULL)
M-361 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony21 All is lost,
(This foule Egyptian hath betrayed me:)
M-362 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony24 Hearke, the Land bids me tread no more upon't,
(I have fled my selfe, and have instructed cowards)
M-363 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony32 I will o’re-take thee Cleopatra, and
(I have liv’d in such dishonour, that the Gods)
M-364 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony19 If that thy Father live, let him repent
(NULL)
M-365 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony22 No more light Answeres:
(The cause of our Expedience to the Queene,)
M-366 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony22 Sometime we see a clowd that’s Dragonish,
(I made these warres for Egypt, and the Queene,)
M-367 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony27 We have beate him to his Campe: Runne one
(Mine Nightingale, We have beate them to their Beds.)
M-368 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cæsar (Octavius)22 Anthony, Leave thy lascivious Vassailes. When thou once
(NULL)
M-369 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cæsar (Octavius)28 You may see Lepidus, and henceforth know,
(His vacancie with his Voluptuousnesse)
M-370 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Enobarbus30 I will tell you,
(The Barge she sate in, like a burnisht Throne)
W-360 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra33 Give me my Robe, put on my Crowne, I have
(NULL)
W-361 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra27 I dreampt there was an Emperor Anthony
(His legges bestrid the Ocean, his rear'd arme)
W-362 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra19 No more but in a Woman, and commanded
(NULL)
W-363 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra17 O Cæsar, what a wounding shame is this,
(NULL)
W-364 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra17 Oh Charmion. Where think'st thou he is now?
(NULL)
W-365 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra17 Where art thou Death?
(Sir, I will eate no meate, Ile not drinke sir,)
W-366 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Octavia16 Oh my good Lord,
(Beleeve not all, or if you must beleeve,)
M-380 Coriolanus Auffidius30 All places yeelds to him ere he sits downe,
(So hated, and so banish’d: but he ha’s a Merit)
M-381 Coriolanus Auffidius35 Oh Martius, Martius;
(Each word thou hast spoke, hath weeded from my heart)
M-382 Coriolanus Brutus18 All tongues speake of him, and the bleared sights
(NULL)
M-383 Coriolanus Cominius41 I shall lacke voyce: the deeds of Coriolanus
(NULL)
M-384 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)32 Come leave your teares: a brief farwel: the beast
(I shall be lov'd when I am lack'd. Nay Mother,)
M-385 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)22 He that will give good words to thee, wil flatter
(NULL)
M-386 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)20 Most sweet Voyces:
(NULL)
M-387 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)37 My name is Caius Martius, who hath done
(NULL)
M-388 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)25 Shall remaine?
(Shall? O God! but most unwise Patricians: why)
M-389 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)29 This last old man,
(My wife comes formost, then the honour’d mould)
M-390 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)16 You common cry of Curs, whose breath I hate,
(NULL)
M-391 Coriolanus Menenius19 (prose) I am knowne to be a humorous Patritian,
(NULL)
W-380 Coriolanus Volumnia23 (prose) I pray you daughter sing, or expresse your selfe
(To a cruell Warre I sent him, from whence he return’d, his browes bound with Oake.)
W-381 Coriolanus Volumnia25 If it be Honor in your Warres, to seeme
(Now it lyes you on to speake to th’people:)
W-382 Coriolanus Volumnia51 Nay, go not from us thus:
(That if thou conquer Rome, the benefit)
W-383 Coriolanus Volumnia32 Should we be silent and not speak, our Raiment
(Alas! how can we, for our Country pray?)
M-400 Hamlet Player King (First Player)29 Anon he findes him,
(NULL)
M-401 Hamlet Player King (First Player)45 Anon he findes him, (Extended)
(NULL)
M-402 Hamlet Ghost48 I that incestuous, that adulterate Beast
(NULL)
M-403 Hamlet Hamlet32 Extasie? My Pulse as yours doth temperately keepe time,
(O throw away the worser part of it,)
M-404 Hamlet Hamlet34 I so, God buy'ye: Now I am alone.
(Oh what a Rogue and Pesant slave am I?)
M-405 Hamlet Hamlet57 I so, God buy'ye: Now I am alone. (Extended)
(Oh what a Rogue and Pesant slave am I?)
M-406 Hamlet Hamlet18 (prose) I will tell you why; so shall my anticipation
(What a piece of worke is a man!)
M-407 Hamlet Hamlet26 Ile be with you straight, goe a little before. (Quarto speech)
(How all occasions doe informe against me,)
M-408 Hamlet Hamlet27 Looke heere upon this Picture, and on this,
(NULL)
M-409 Hamlet Hamlet22 Now might I do it pat, now he is praying,
(NULL)
M-410 Hamlet Hamlet20 Oh all you host of Heaven! Oh Earth; what els?
(NULL)
M-411 Hamlet Hamlet31 Oh that this too, too solid Flesh would melt,
(NULL)
M-412 Hamlet Hamlet34 (prose) Speake the Speech I pray you, as I pronounc'd
(NULL)
M-413 Hamlet Hamlet42 (prose) Speake the Speech I pray you, as I pronounc'd (Extended)
(NULL)
M-414 Hamlet Hamlet35 To be, or not to be, that is the Question:
(NULL)
M-415 Hamlet Horatio28 Season your admiration for a while
(Two nights together, had these Gentlemen)
M-416 Hamlet Horatio40 That can I, At least the whisper goes so: Our last King,
(Ile crosse it, though it blast me. Stay Illusion:)
M-417 Hamlet King (Claudius)14 Laertes, I must common with your greefe,
(NULL)
M-418 Hamlet King (Claudius)37 Oh my offence is ranke, it smels to heaven,
(NULL)
M-419 Hamlet King (Claudius)25 Though yet of Hamlet our deere Brothers death
(NULL)
M-420 Hamlet Laertes35 Thinke it no more:
(Feare it Ophelia, feare it my deare Sister,)
M-421 Hamlet Polonius22 My Liege, and Madam, to expostulate
(Madam, I sweare I use no Art at all:)
M-422 Hamlet Polonius41 My Liege, and Madam, to expostulate (Extended)
(Madam, I sweare I use no Art at all:)
M-423 Hamlet Polonius27 Yet heere Laertes? Aboord, aboord for shame,
(NULL)
W-400 Hamlet Queene (Gertrude)16 Alas, how is't with you?
(This is the very coynage of your Braine,)
W-401 Hamlet Queene (Gertrude)18 There is a Willow growes aslant a Brooke,
(NULL)
W-402 Hamlet Ophelia24 Alas my Lord, I have beene so affrighted.
(My Lord, as I was sowing in my Chamber,)
W-403 Hamlet Ophelia12 O what a Noble minde is heere o're-throwne?
(NULL)
W-404 Hamlet Ophelia26 They bore him bare fac'd on the Beer,
(There's Rosemary, that's for Remembraunce.)
M-440 Julius Cæsar Antony35 Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears:
(NULL)
M-441 Julius Cæsar Antony21 Good Friends, sweet Friends, let me not stirre you up
(NULL)
M-442 Julius Cæsar Antony29 If you have teares, prepare to shed them now.
(NULL)
M-443 Julius Cæsar Antony16 O mighty Cæsar! Dost thou lye so lowe?
(NULL)
M-444 Julius Cæsar Antony22 O pardon me, thou bleeding peece of Earth:
(NULL)
M-445 Julius Cæsar Brutus34 (prose) Be patient till the last.
(Romans, Countrey-men, and Lovers, heare mee)
M-446 Julius Cæsar Brutus25 It must be by his death: and for my part
(NULL)
M-447 Julius Cæsar Cassius42 I know that vertue to be in you Brutus,
(NULL)
M-448 Julius Cæsar Cassius27 Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world
(NULL)
M-449 Julius Cæsar Cæsar30 I must prevent thee Cymber:
(I could well be mov'd, if I were as you,)
M-450 Julius Cæsar Cæsar21 Let me have men about me, that are fat,
(NULL)
W-440 Julius Cæsar Portia62 Brutus, my Lord.
(Nor for yours neither. Y'have ungently Brutus/Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall;/I graunt I am a Woman;)
W-441 Julius Cæsar Portia21 I should not neede, if you were gentle Brutus.
(I graunt I am a Woman;)
W-442 Julius Cæsar Portia27 Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall
(NULL)
W-443 Julius Cæsar Portia39 Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall (Extended)
(I graunt I am a Woman;)
W-444 Julius Cæsar Portia20 Nor for yours neither. Y'have ungently Brutus
(NULL)
M-460 King Lear Edgar21 I heard myselfe proclaim'd
(NULL)
M-461 King Lear Edgar19 List a breefe tale,
(Met I my Father with his bleeding Rings,)
M-462 King Lear Edgar23 Sit you downe Father: rest you.
(NULL)
M-463 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)27 Perswade me to the murther of your Lordship,
(When I disswaded him from his intent,)
M-464 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)24 The Duke be here to night? The better best,
(In cunning, I must draw my Sword upon you:)
M-465 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)19 The Enemy’s in view, draw up your powers,
(To both these Sisters have I sworne my love:)
M-466 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)19 (prose) This is the excellent foppery of the world, that
(NULL)
M-467 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)22 Thou Nature art my Goddesse, to thy Law
(NULL)
M-468 King Lear Foole20 He that has and a little-tyne wit,
(This is a brave night to coole a Curtizan:)
M-469 King Lear Foole32 Sirha, Ile teach thee a speech.
(Marke it Nuncle;/Why after I have cut the egge i'th'middle and)
M-470 King Lear Foole16 This is a brave night to coole a Curtizan:
(NULL)
M-471 King Lear Gloucester18 (prose) He cannot bee such a Monster. Edmond seeke
(These late Eclipses in the Sun and Moone)
M-472 King Lear Kent22 (prose) Fellow I know thee.
(A Knave, a Rascall, an eater of broken meates, a/What a brazen-fac’d Varlet art thou, to deny)
M-473 King Lear Lear34 Blow windes, and crack your cheeks; Rage, blow
(Rumble thy belly full: spit Fire, spowt Raine:)
M-474 King Lear Lear22 Howle, howle, howle: O you are men of stones,
(NULL)
M-475 King Lear Lear20 I, every inch a King.
(NULL)
M-476 King Lear Lear17 Ile tell thee: Life and death, I am asham'd
(Blastes and Fogges upon thee:)
M-477 King Lear Lear22 O reason not the need: our basest Beggers
(NULL)
M-478 King Lear Lear25 Returne to her? and fifty men dismiss’d?
(I prythee Daughter do not make me mad,)
M-479 King Lear Lear20 The King would speake with Cornwall,
(Fiery? The fiery Duke, tell the hot Duke that—)
W-460 King Lear Cordelia22 I yet beseech your Majesty.
(The Jewels of our Father, with wash'd eies)
W-461 King Lear Cordelia14 O my deere Father, restauratian hang
(NULL)
W-462 King Lear Cordelia16 O thou good Kent,
(NULL)
W-463 King Lear Gonerill19 Did my Father strike my Gentleman for chiding
(By day and night, he wrongs me, every howre)
W-464 King Lear Gonerill18 Not only Sir this, your all-lycenc’d Foole,
(NULL)
W-465 King Lear Gonerill18 This admiration Sir, is much o'th'savour
(NULL)
W-466 King Lear Regan24 I pray you Father being weake, seeme so.
(I dare avouch it Sir, what fifty Followers?)
W-467 King Lear Regan19 Why should she write to Edmund?
(I know your Lady do’s not love her Husband,)
G-480 Macbeth Malcolme29 Be not offended:
(I thinke our Country sinkes beneath the yoake;/I grant him Bloody,)
G-481 Macbeth Malcolme24 Macduff, this Noble passion
(NULL)
M-480 Macbeth Captaine26 Doubtfull it stood,
(NULL)
M-481 Macbeth Lenox25 My former Speeches,
(NULL)
M-482 Macbeth Macbeth27 Bring them before us.
(To be thus, is nothing, but to be safely thus:)
M-483 Macbeth Macbeth14 Fled to England?
(Time, thou anticipat'st my dread exploits:)
M-484 Macbeth Macbeth34 Goe bid thy Mistresse, when my drinke is ready,
(Is this a Dagger, which I see before me,)
M-485 Macbeth Macbeth26 Hang out our Banners on the outward walls,
(She should have dy'de heereafter;/To morrow, and to morrow, and to morrow,)
M-486 Macbeth Macbeth17 I, in the Catalogue ye goe for men,
(NULL)
M-487 Macbeth Macbeth28 If it were done, when 'tis done, then 'twer well,
(NULL)
M-488 Macbeth Macbeth23 Me thought I heard a voyce cry, Sleep no more:
(NULL)
M-489 Macbeth Macbeth12 She should have dy'de heereafter;
(To morrow, and to morrow, and to morrow,)
M-490 Macbeth Malcolme29 Be not offended:
(I thinke our Country sinkes beneath the yoake;/I grant him Bloody,)
M-491 Macbeth Malcolme24 Macduff, this Noble passion
(NULL)
M-492 Macbeth Porter19 (prose) Here's a knocking indeede: if a man were
(NULL)
W-480 Macbeth Hecat28 Have I not reason (Beldams) as you are?
(NULL)
W-481 Macbeth Lady Macbeth23 Glamys thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be
(NULL)
W-482 Macbeth Lady Macbeth40 Glamys thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be (Extended)
(NULL)
W-483 Macbeth Lady Macbeth15 That which hath made them drunk, hath made me bold:
(NULL)
W-484 Macbeth Lady Macbeth22 The Raven himselfe is hoarse,
(NULL)
W-485 Macbeth Lady Macbeth24 Was the hope drunke,
(What Beast was't then)
W-486 Macbeth Lady Macbeth41 Was the hope drunke, (Extended)
(What Beast was't then)
W-487 Macbeth Lady Macbeth24 Who was it, that thus cry'd? why worthy Thane,
(Give me the daggers: the sleeping, and the dead,/My Hands are of your colour: but I shame)
W-488 Macbeth Lady Macbeth19 (prose) Yet heere's a spot.
(NULL)
W-489 Macbeth First Witch38 Thrice the brinded Cat hath mew'd.
(Double, double, toile and trouble;)
M-500 Othello Brabantio21 Oh thou foule Theefe,
(NULL)
M-501 Othello Cassio22 The Riches of the Ship is come on shore:
(The Riches of the Ship is come on shore:)
M-502 Othello Iago29 And what's he then,
(That saies I play the Villaine?)
M-503 Othello Iago19 How poore are they that have not Patience?
(NULL)
M-504 Othello Iago27 O Sir content you.
(NULL)
M-505 Othello Iago27 That Cassio loves her, I do well beleev't:
(NULL)
M-506 Othello Iago22 Thus do I ever make my Foole, my purse:
(NULL)
M-507 Othello Iago14 (prose) Vertue? A figge, 'tis in our selves that we are
(NULL)
M-508 Othello Othello23 Behold, I have a weapon:
(NULL)
M-509 Othello Othello23 Had it pleas’d Heaven,
(I heere looke grim as hell.)
M-510 Othello Othello43 Her Father lov'd me, oft invited me:
(NULL)
M-511 Othello Othello23 It is the Cause, it is the Cause (my Soule)
(NULL)
M-512 Othello Othello20 Soft you; a word or two before you goe:
(I have done the State some service, and they know't:)
M-513 Othello Othello22 That’s a fault: That Handkerchiefe
(’Tis true: There’s Magicke in the web of it:)
M-514 Othello Othello22 This Fellow’s of exceeding honesty,
(Must be to loath her. Oh Curse of Marriage!)
M-515 Othello Othello17 Why? why is this?
(Think'st thou, I'ld make a Life of Jealousie;)
M-516 Othello Rodorigo21 Sir, I will answere any thing. But I beseech you
(To the grosse claspes of a Lascivious Moore:)
W-500 Othello Æmilia20 Yes, a dozen: and as many to'th'vantage, as
(But I do thinke it is their Husbands faults)
W-501 Othello Desdemona17 Alas Iago,
(What shall I do to win my Lord againe?)
W-502 Othello Desdemona20 He saies he will returne incontinent,
(My Mother had a Maid call'd Barbarie)
M-520 Romeo and Juliet Benvolio23 Heere were the servants of your adversarie,
(Madam, an houre before the worshipt Sun)
M-521 Romeo and Juliet Benvolio24 Tybalt here slaine, whom Romeo's hand did slay,
(NULL)
M-522 Romeo and Juliet Capulet21 Gods bread, it makes me mad:
(NULL)
M-523 Romeo and Juliet Capulet27 When the Sun sets, the earth doth drizzle daew
(How now? Chopt Logicke? what is this?)
M-524 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence32 Hold then: goe home, be merrie, give consent,
(NULL)
M-525 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence27 Hold thy desperate hand:
(NULL)
M-526 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence51 Hold thy desperate hand: (Extended)
(NULL)
M-527 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence30 The gray ey'd morne smiles on the frowning night,
(NULL)
M-528 Romeo and Juliet Mercutio32 Nay, Ile conjure too.
(Romeo, Humours, Madman, Passion, Lover,)
M-529 Romeo and Juliet Mercutio35 (prose) O then I see Queene Mab hath beene with you:
(NULL)
M-530 Romeo and Juliet Prince (Eskales)23 Rebellious Subjects, Enemies to peace,
(NULL)
M-531 Romeo and Juliet Romeo25 Alas that love, whose view is muffled still,
(NULL)
M-532 Romeo and Juliet Romeo24 He jeasts at Scarres that never felt a wound,
(But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?)
M-533 Romeo and Juliet Romeo16 What Ladie is that which doth inrich the hand
(O she doth teach the Torches to burne bright;/If I prophane with my unworthiest hand,)
M-534 Romeo and Juliet Romeo22 Tis Torture and not mercy, heaven is here
(NULL)
M-535 Romeo and Juliet Romeo24 Well Juliet, I will lie with thee to night:
(NULL)
W-520 Romeo and Juliet Juliet35 Farewell: God knowes when we shall meete againe.
(NULL)
W-521 Romeo and Juliet Juliet45 Farewell: God knowes when we shall meete againe. (Extended)
(NULL)
W-522 Romeo and Juliet Juliet35 Gallop apace, you fiery footed steedes,
(NULL)
W-523 Romeo and Juliet Juliet16 O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
(NULL)
W-524 Romeo and Juliet Juliet30 Shall I speake ill of him that is my husband?
(NULL)
W-525 Romeo and Juliet Juliet22 Thou knowest the maske of night is on my face
(NULL)
W-526 Romeo and Juliet Lady Capulet17 What say you, can you love the Gentleman?
(NULL)
W-527 Romeo and Juliet Nurse36 (prose) Even or odde, of all daies in the yeare come
(NULL)
W-528 Romeo and Juliet Nurse14 Faith here it is,
(Romeo is banished, and all the world to nothing,)
M-540 Titus Andronicus Aaron29 For shame be friends, and joyne for that you jar:
(NULL)
M-541 Titus Andronicus Aaron21 I, that I had not done a thousand more:
(NULL)
M-542 Titus Andronicus Aaron24 Indeede, I was their Tutor to instruct them
(NULL)
M-543 Titus Andronicus Aaron25 Now climbeth Tamora Olympus toppe,
(NULL)
M-544 Titus Andronicus Aaron24 Sooner this sword shall plough thy bowels up.
(My mistris is my mistris: this my selfe,)
M-545 Titus Andronicus Aaron28 ’Twas her two Sonnes that murdered Bassianus,
(Indeede, I was their Tutor to instruct them)
M-546 Titus Andronicus Lucius23 This Noble Auditory, be it knowne to you,
(And they it were that ravished our Sister,)
M-547 Titus Andronicus Marcus28 Princes, that strive by Factions, and by Friends,
(Chosen Andronicus, Sur-named Pious,)
M-548 Titus Andronicus Marcus47 Who is this, my Neece that flies away so fast?
(NULL)
M-549 Titus Andronicus Marcus29 You sad fac’d men, people and Sonnes of Rome,
(Let Rome herselfe be bane unto herselfe,)
M-550 Titus Andronicus Saturninus27 Why Lords, What wrongs are these? was ever seene
(NULL)
M-551 Titus Andronicus Second Goth20 Renowned Lucius, from our troups I straid,
(I heard a childe cry underneath a wall:)
M-552 Titus Andronicus Titus40 Come, come Lavinia, looke, thy Foes are bound,
(NULL)
M-553 Titus Andronicus Titus23 Come Marcus, come, kinsmen this is the way.
(Ah Rome! Well, well, I made thee miserable,)
M-554 Titus Andronicus Titus42 Faint-harted boy, arise and looke upon her,
(Thou hast no hands to wipe away thy teares,)
M-555 Titus Andronicus Titus27 Haile Rome:
(These that Survive, let Rome reward with Love:)
M-556 Titus Andronicus Titus26 Heare me grave fathers, noble Tribunes stay,
(Be pittifull to my condemned Sonnes,)
M-557 Titus Andronicus Titus25 O heere I lift this one hand up to heaven,
(If there were reason for these miseries,)
M-558 Titus Andronicus Titus43 So, so, now sit, and looke you eate no more
(Thou shalt not sighe nor hold thy stumps to heaven,)
M-559 Titus Andronicus Titus22 Why I have not another teare to shed:
(Beare thou my hand sweet wench betweene thy teeth:)
W-540 Titus Andronicus Lavinia31 Oh Tamora, thou bear'st a woman face.
(Doe this, and be a charitable murderer.)
W-541 Titus Andronicus Tamora25 Have I not reason thinke you to looke pale.
(NULL)
W-542 Titus Andronicus Tamora26 King, be thy thoughts Imperious like thy name.
(NULL)
W-543 Titus Andronicus Tamora21 My lovely Aaron,
(NULL)
W-544 Titus Andronicus Tamora30 My worthy Lord if ever Tamora,
(The Gods of Rome for-fend,)
M-560 Tymon of Athens Alcibiades19 My Lords, then under favour, pardon me,
(NULL)
M-561 Tymon of Athens Tymon41 Let me looke backe upon thee. Oh thou Wall,
(NULL)
M-562 Tymon of Athens Tymon49 O blessed breeding Sun, draw from the earth
(NULL)
M-563 Tymon of Athens Tymon24 That by killing of Villaines
(NULL)
M-564 Tymon of Athens Tymon21 That Nature being sicke of mans unkindnesse
(NULL)
Romance
G-570 Cymbeline Guiderius24 Feare no more the heate o'th'Sun, (chant)
(NULL)
G-570 Cymbeline Arviragus24 Feare no more the heate o'th'Sun, (chant)
(NULL)
G-571 Cymbeline Arviragus25 The Bird is dead
(NULL)
M-570 Cymbeline Arviragus25 The Bird is dead
(NULL)
M-571 Cymbeline Belarius30 How hard it is to hide the sparkes of Nature?
(These Boyes know little they are Sonnes to’th’King,)
M-572 Cymbeline Belarius21 So sure as you, your Fathers: I (old Morgan)
(Heere are your Sonnes againe, and I must loose)
M-573 Cymbeline Clotten24 (prose) I am neere to’th’place where they should meet,
(NULL)
M-574 Cymbeline Clotten28 (prose) I love, and hate her: for she’s Faire and Royall,
(Ile have this Secret from thy heart, or rip)
M-575 Cymbeline Cymbeline22 O rare instinct!
(And when came you to serve our Romane Captive?)
M-576 Cymbeline Iachimo41 All too soone I shall,
(Your daughters Chastity, (there it beginnes))
M-577 Cymbeline Iachimo20 Thankes fairest Lady:
(What are men mad? Hath Nature given them eyes)
M-578 Cymbeline Iachimo41 The Crickets sing, and mans ore-labor'd sense
(NULL)
M-579 Cymbeline Pisanio23 How? of Adultery? Wherefore write you not
(NULL)
M-580 Cymbeline Pisanio26 Well then, heere's the point:
(You must forget to be a Woman: change)
M-581 Cymbeline Posthumus38 Close by the battell, ditch’d, and wall’d with turph,
(NULL)
M-582 Cymbeline Posthumus35 Is there no way for Men to be, but Women
(NULL)
M-583 Cymbeline Posthumus27 Most welcome bondage; for thou art a way
(NULL)
M-584 Cymbeline Posthumus33 Yea bloody cloth, Ile keep thee: for I am wisht
(NULL)
W-570 Cymbeline Imogen15 Away, I do condemne mine eares, that have
(NULL)
W-571 Cymbeline Imogen33 False to his Bed? What is it to be false?
(NULL)
W-572 Cymbeline Imogen27 I see a mans life is a tedious one,
(NULL)
W-573 Cymbeline Imogen21 Oh for a Horse with wings: Hear'st thou Pisanio?
(NULL)
W-574 Cymbeline Imogen23 Thou should'st have made him
(I would have broke mine eye-strings;)
W-575 Cymbeline Imogen28 Thou told'st me when we came from horse, the place
(NULL)
W-576 Cymbeline Imogen16 True honest men being heard, like false Æneas,
(NULL)
W-577 Cymbeline Imogen35 Who, thy Lord? That is my Lord Leonatus?
(Oh for a Horse with wings: Hear'st thou Pisanio?)
W-578 Cymbeline Imogen25 Why, I must dye:
(And if I do not by thy hand, thou art)
W-579 Cymbeline Imogen42 Yes sir, to Milford-Haven, which is the way?
(NULL)
W-580 Cymbeline Queene20 That opportunity
(And Britaines strut with Courage.)
W-581 Cymbeline Queene38 Weepes she still (saist thou?)
(NULL)
G-590 Pericles Gower40 Here have you seen a mighty King
(His child, I wis, to incest bring:)
G-591 Pericles Gower52 Imagine Pericles arriv’d at Tyre,
(Now to Marina bend your minde,)
G-592 Pericles Gower18 In Antiochus and his daughter, you have heard
(Of monstrous lust, the due and just reward:)
G-593 Pericles Gower24 Marina thus the Brothel scapes, and chances
(NULL)
G-594 Pericles Gower20 Now take we our way
(No vizor does become black villany,)
G-595 Pericles Gower60 Now ysleep slaked hath the rout,
(And so to Sea; their vessell shakes,)
G-596 Pericles Gower42 To sing a song that old was sung,
(And her to incest did provoke.)
G-597 Pericles Gower50 Thus time we waste, and longest leagues make short,
(Let Pericles believe his Daughter’s dead,)
M-590 Pericles Antiochus16 He hath found the meaning,
(NULL)
M-591 Pericles Cleon47 My Dyonisia, shall we rest us here,
(This Tharsus, ore which I have the government,)
M-592 Pericles Cleon29 This Tharsus, ore which I have the government,
(Would now be glad of bread, and beg for it:)
M-593 Pericles Gower40 Here have you seen a mighty King
(His child, I wis, to incest bring:)
M-594 Pericles Gower52 Imagine Pericles arriv’d at Tyre,
(Now to Marina bend your minde,)
M-595 Pericles Gower18 In Antiochus and his daughter, you have heard
(Of monstrous lust, the due and just reward:)
M-596 Pericles Gower24 Marina thus the Brothel scapes, and chances
(NULL)
M-597 Pericles Gower20 Now take we our way
(No vizor does become black villany,)
M-598 Pericles Gower60 Now ysleep slaked hath the rout,
(And so to Sea; their vessell shakes,)
M-599 Pericles Gower42 To sing a song that old was sung,
(And her to incest did provoke.)
M-600 Pericles Gower50 Thus time we waste, and longest leagues make short,
(Let Pericles believe his Daughter’s dead,)
M-601 Pericles Pericles23 An Armor, friends, I pray you let me see it.
(NULL)
M-602 Pericles Pericles40 Great King, Few love to hear the sins they love to act,
(How curtesie would seem to cover sin,/By your untimely claspings with your child,)
M-603 Pericles Pericles34 Let none disturb us:
(Here pleasures court mine eyes, and mine eyes shun them,)
M-604 Pericles Pericles26 Like a bold champion I assume the listes,
(NULL)
M-605 Pericles Pericles30 See where she comes, apparell’d like the Spring,
(To taste the fruite of yon celestiall tree,)
M-606 Pericles Pericles34 Thou speak’st like a Physician, Hellicanus,
(The rest (hark in thine ear) as black as incest,)
W-590 Pericles Dionisia31 Thy oath remember, thou hast sworn to do it,
(NULL)
W-591 Pericles Marina19 (prose) Neither of these are so bad as thou art, since
(NULL)
G-610 The Tempest Ariel25 All haile, great Master, grave Sir, haile: I come
(NULL)
G-611 The Tempest Ariel30 You are three men of sinne, whom destiny
(NULL)
M-610 The Tempest Anthonio18 I Sir: where lies that? If 'twere a kybe
(NULL)
M-611 The Tempest Caliban17 All the infections that the Sunne suckes up
(NULL)
M-612 The Tempest Caliban19 As wicked dewe, as ere my mother brush'd
(I must eat my dinner: This Island's mine by Sycorax my mother,)
M-613 The Tempest Caliban19 Beate him enough: after a little time
(Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custome with him)
M-614 The Tempest Caliban16 Within this halfe houre will he be asleepe,
(Be not affeard, the Isle is full of noyses,)
M-615 The Tempest Ferdinand27 Admir'd Miranda,
(Indeede the top of Admiration, worth/I am, in my condition;)
M-616 The Tempest Ferdinand25 No, noble Mistris, 'tis fresh morning with me
(Admir'd Miranda,)
M-617 The Tempest Ferdinand15 There be some Sports are painfull; and their labor
(NULL)
M-618 The Tempest Prospero30 A solemne Ayre, and the best comforter,
(Holy Gonzallo, Honourable man,)
M-619 The Tempest Prospero23 As great to me, as late, and supportable
(In this last Tempest. I perceive these Lords)
M-620 The Tempest Prospero20 Now my Charmes are all ore-throwne,
(NULL)
M-621 The Tempest Prospero28 This blew ey’d hag, was hither brought with child,
(NULL)
M-622 The Tempest Prospero25 Ye Elves of hils, brooks, standing lakes and groves,
(NULL)
M-623 The Tempest Prospero18 You doe looke (my son) in a mov'd sort,
(Our Revels now are ended: These our actors,)
M-624 The Tempest Trinculo24 (prose) Here's neither bush, nor shrub to beare off any
(NULL)
W-610 The Tempest Miranda25 I do not know
(One of my sexe; no womans face remember,)
W-611 The Tempest Miranda20 If by your Art (my deerest father) you have
(NULL)
G-630 The Winters Tale Time32 I that please some, try all: both joy and terror
(NULL)
M-630 The Winters Tale Antigonus44 Come, poore babe;
(NULL)
M-631 The Winters Tale Florizell17 What you do,
(Still betters what is done. When you speake (Sweet))
M-631 The Winters Tale Camillo28 My gracious Lord,
(If ever I were wilfull-negligent,)
M-632 The Winters Tale Leontes25 Ha' not you seene Camillo?
(Is whispering nothing?)
M-632 The Winters Tale Clowne22 (prose) Hilloa, loa.
(I have seene two such sights, by Sea and by Land:)
M-633 The Winters Tale Leontes18 How blest am I
(With violent Hefts: I have drunke, and seene the Spider.)
M-634 The Winters Tale Leontes29 To your owne bents dispose you: you'le be found
(Ynch-thicke; knee-deepe; o're head and eares a fork'd one.)
M-635 The Winters Tale Leontes21 Too hot, too hot:
(I'fecks: Why that's my Bawcock: what? has't snatch'd thy Nose?)
W-630 The Winters Tale Hermione18 More then Mistresse of,
(NULL)
W-631 The Winters Tale Hermione33 Since what I am to say, must be but that
(NULL)
W-632 The Winters Tale Hermione26 Sir, spare your Threats:
(NULL)
W-633 The Winters Tale Paulina26 I dare be sworne:
(These dangerous, unsafe Lunes i'th'King, beshrew them:)
W-634 The Winters Tale Paulina27 I say she's dead: Ile sweare't. If word, nor oath
(NULL)
W-635 The Winters Tale Paulina28 What studied torments (Tyrant) hast for me?
(NULL)
W-636 The Winters Tale Paulina55 What studied torments (Tyrant) hast for me? (Extended)
(NULL)
W-637 The Winters Tale Perdita30 Ile not put The Dible in earth, to set one slip of them:
(NULL)
History
G-650 King John Arthur17 Mercie on me:
(NULL)
G-651 King John Arthur20 Must you with hot Irons, burne out both mine eyes?
(Have you the heart? When your head did but ake,)
G-652 King John Prince Henry19 It is too late, the life of all his blood
(Oh vanity of sicknesse: fierce extreames)
M-650 King John Bastard (Philip)40 A foot of Honor better then I was,
(Well, now can I make any Joane a Lady,)
M-651 King John Bastard (Philip)32 By all the bloud that ever fury breath'd,
(To whip this dwarfish warre, this Pigmy Armes)
M-652 King John Bastard (Philip)24 By heaven, these scroyles of Angiers flout you kings,
(Be friends a-while, and both conjoyntly bend)
M-653 King John Bastard (Philip)21 Go, beare him in thine armes:
(NULL)
M-654 King John Bastard (Philip)38 Mad world, mad kings, mad composition:
(NULL)
M-655 King John Bastard (Philip)31 So on my soule he did, for ought he knew:
(But wherefore doe you droope? why looke you sad?/A cockred-silken wanton brave our fields,)
M-656 King John Dolphin (Lewis)29 A noble temper dost thou shew in this,
(Let me wipe off this honourable dewe,)
M-656 King John Chattilion25 Then turne your forces from this paltry siege,
(NULL)
M-657 King John Dolphin (Lewis)31 Your Grace shall pardon me, I will not backe:
(NULL)
M-658 King John Hubert21 My Lord, they say five Moones were seene to night:
(Old men, and Beldames, in the streets)
M-659 King John Hubert33 That daughter there of Spaine, the Lady Blanch
(NULL)
M-660 King John King John28 For our advantage, therefore heare us first:
(The Canons have their bowels full of wrath,)
M-661 King John King John26 Good friend, thou hast no cause to say so yet,
(I had a thing to say, but let it goe:)
M-662 King John King John32 Oh, when the last accompt twixt heaven and earth
(Had’st thou but shooke thy head, or made a pause)
M-663 King John King John25 Why seek'st thou to possesse me with these feares? (Extended)
(It is the curse of Kings, to be attended)
M-664 King John King Philip29 Good reverend father, make my person yours,
(NULL)
M-665 King John King Philip32 When I have saide, make answer to us both.
(We will beare home that lustie blood againe,)
M-666 King John Meloone27 Have I not hideous death within my view,
(NULL)
M-667 King John Pandulph20 O Sir, when he shall heare of your approach,
(NULL)
M-668 King John Pandulph35 So mak'st thou faith an enemy to faith,
(NULL)
M-669 King John Prince Henry19 It is too late, the life of all his blood
(Oh vanity of sicknesse: fierce extreames)
M-670 King John Salisbury20 Therefore, to be possess’d with double pompe,
(To gilde refined Gold, to paint the Lilly;)
W-650 King John Constance27 A wicked day, and not a holy day.
(You have beguil'd me with a counterfeit)
W-651 King John Constance29 Doe childe, goe to it grandame childe,
(Now shame upon you where she does or no;/Thou monstrous Injurer of heaven and earth,)
W-652 King John Constance26 Gone to be married? Gone to sweare a peace?
(NULL)
W-653 King John Constance23 If thou that bidst me be content, wert grim
(NULL)
W-654 King John Constance20 No, I defie all Counsell, all redresse,
(No, no, I will not, having breath to cry:)
W-655 King John Constance23 No, no, I will not, having breath to cry:
(I am not mad: this haire I teare is mine,)
W-656 King John Constance38 Thou art holy to belye me so,
(I am not mad: this haire I teare is mine,/Yes that I will: and wherefore will I do it?)
W-657 King John Constance22 Yes that I will: and wherefore will I do it?
(Greefe fils the roome up of my absent childe:)
W-658 King John Constance31 You have beguil’d me with a counterfeit
(War, war, no peace, peace is to me a warre:)
W-659 King John Lady Faulconbridge15 Where is that slave thy brother? where is he?
(King Richard Cordelion was thy father,)
M-680 Richard the Second Bullingbrooke17 Noble Lord,
(Goe to the rude Ribs of that ancient Castle,)
M-681 Richard the Second Bullingbrooke30 Noble Lord, (Extended)
(Goe to the rude Ribs of that ancient Castle,)
M-682 Richard the Second Bishop of Carlile36 Mary, Heaven forbid.
(NULL)
M-683 Richard the Second Gaunt38 Me thinkes I am a Prophet new inspir'd
(This royal Throne of Kings, this sceptered Isle)
M-684 Richard the Second Gaunt29 This royal Throne of Kings, this sceptered Isle
(NULL)
M-685 Richard the Second King Richard (II)30 A King of Beasts indeed: if ought but Beasts,
(NULL)
M-686 Richard the Second King Richard (II)26 Discomfortable Cousin, knowest thou not,
(NULL)
M-687 Richard the Second King Richard (II)29 I have been studying, how to compare
(NULL)
M-688 Richard the Second King Richard (II)65 I have been studying, how to compare (Extended)
(NULL)
M-689 Richard the Second King Richard (II)17 Mowbray, impartiall are our eyes and eares,
(Wrath-kindled Gentlemen be rul'd by me:)
M-690 Richard the Second King Richard (II)23 Needs must I like it well: I weepe for joy
(Deere Earth, I doe salute thee with my hand,)
M-691 Richard the Second King Richard (II)34 No matter where; of comfort no man speake:
(NULL)
M-692 Richard the Second King Richard (II)29 Wee are amaz'd, and thus long have we stood
(NULL)
M-693 Richard the Second King Richard (II)33 What must the King doe now? must he submit?
(NULL)
M-694 Richard the Second Yorke23 Heav'n for his mercy, what a tide of woes
(NULL)
W-680 Richard the Second Duchesse of Gloucester28 Findes brotherhood in thee no sharper spurre?
(NULL)
W-681 Richard the Second Duchesse of Gloucester29 Why then I will: farewell old Gaunt.
(Desolate, desolate will I hence, and dye,)
W-682 Richard the Second Duchesse of Yorke25 Why Yorke, what wilt thou do?
(Have we more Sonnes? Or are we like to have?)
W-683 Richard the Second Queene19 Oh I am prest to death through want of speaking:
(Why do'st thou say, King Richard is depos'd,)
W-684 Richard the Second Queene24 This way the King will come: this is the way
(NULL)
M-700 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe20 (prose) I am accurst to rob in that Theefe company: that
(NULL)
M-701 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe37 (prose) If I be not asham’d of my Souldiers, I am a
(NULL)
M-702 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe17 (prose) Imbowell’d? If thou imbowell mee to day, Ile
(NULL)
M-703 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe36 (prose) Peace good Pint-pot, peace good Tickle-braine.
(A goodly portly man yfaith, and a corpulent,)
M-704 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe14 (prose) Tis not due yet: I would bee loath to pay him
(Honor prickes me on.)
M-705 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Gads-hill18 (prose) Sirra, if they meete not with Saint Nicholas Clarks,
(What talkest thou to me of the Hangman? If I)
M-706 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)33 But soft I pray you; did King Richard then
(Nay then I cannot blame his Cousin King)
M-707 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)41 My Liege, I did deny no Prisoners.
(NULL)
M-708 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)24 Revolted Mortimer?
(Three times they breath’d, and three times did they drink)
M-709 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)38 The King is kinde: And well wee know, the King
(NULL)
M-710 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)36 For all the World,
(Why, Harry, doe I tell thee of my Foes,)
M-711 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)64 Heaven pardon thee:
(Thy place in Councell thou hast rudely lost/He was but as the Cuckow is in June,)
M-712 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)30 Lords, give us leave:
(Thy place in Councell thou hast rudely lost,)
M-713 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry )IV)33 So shaken as we are, so wan with care,
(To chace these Pagans in those holy Fields,)
M-714 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)26 Yea, there thou mak'st me sad, and mak'st me sin,
(That some Night-tripping-Faiery, had exchang'd)
M-715 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal31 Doe not thinke so, you shall not finde it so:
(NULL)
M-716 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal24 For Wormes, brave Percy. Farewell great heart:
(NULL)
M-717 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal23 I know you all, and will a-while uphold
(Yet heerein will I imitate the Sunne,)
M-718 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal27 (prose) With three or foure Logger-heads, amongst 3
(when I am King of England, I shall command al the good Laddes in East-cheape)
M-719 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Worcester42 It pleas’d your Majesty, to turne your lookes
(For you, my staffe of Office did I breake)
W-700 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Lady Percie28 O my good Lord, why are you thus alone?
(NULL)
G-730 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Epilogue26 First, my Feare: then, my Curtsie: last, my Speech.
(NULL)
G-731 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Rumour40 Open your Eares: For which of you will stop
(NULL)
M-730 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Archbishop of Yorke24 Let us on: And publish the occasion of our Armes.
(Past, and to Come, seemes best; things Present, worst)
M-731 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Archbishop of Yorke35 Wherefore doe I this? so the Question stands.
(Wee see which way the streame of Time doth runne,)
M-732 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Chief Justice29 I then did use the Person of your Father:
(NULL)
M-733 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe30 (prose) Fare you well, gentle Gentlemen. On Bardolph,
(How subject wee old men are to this vice of Lying?)
M-734 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe39 (prose) I would you had but the wit: 'twere better
(They are generally Fooles, and Cowards;)
M-735 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe25 (prose) Ile follow you, good Master Robert Shallow.
(I will devise matter enough out of this Shallow, to)
M-736 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe24 (prose) Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at mee: the
(keepe Prince Harry in continuall Laughter,)
M-737 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe23 (prose) Not so (my Lord) your ill Angell is light: but I
(My Lord, I was borne with a white head, and somthing a round belly.)
M-738 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)31 Goe call the Earles of Surrey, and of Warwick:
(How many thousand of my poorest Subjects)
M-739 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)30 Nothing but well to thee, Thomas of Clarence.
(How chance thou art not with the Prince, thy Brother?)
M-740 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)45 O my Sonne! Heaven put it in thy minde to take it hence,
(To thee, it shall descend with better Quiet,)
M-741 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)31 Oh Heaven, that one might read the Book of Fate,
(This Percie was the man, neerest my Soule,)
M-742 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)24 The Prince hath ta’ne it hence:
(How quickly Nature falls into revolt,)
M-743 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)46 Thy wish was Father (Harry) to that thought:
(Do’st thou so hunger for my emptie Chayre,)
M-744 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Lord Bardolfe34 It was (my Lord) who lin’d himself with hope,
(Hope gives not so much warrant, as Dispaire)
M-745 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Morton31 I am sorry, I should force you to beleeve
(So did our Men, heavy in Hotspurres losse,)
M-746 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Northumberland25 For this, I shall have time enough to mourne.
(And darknesse be the burier of the dead.)
M-747 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Northumberland28 Yea, this mans brow, like to a Title-leafe,
(How doth my Sonne, and Brother?)
M-748 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal25 I know thee not, old man: Fall to thy Prayers:
(NULL)
M-749 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal41 O pardon me (my Liege)
(NULL)
M-750 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal18 This new, and gorgeous Garment, Majesty,
(NULL)
M-751 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal28 Why doth the Crowne lye there, upon his Pillow
(NULL)
M-752 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal44 You are right Justice, and you weigh this well:
(So shall I live, to speake my Fathers words:)
M-753 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince John30 You are wel encountred here (my cosin Mowbray)
(Chearing a rowt of Rebels with your Drumme,)
M-754 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Warwicke24 There is a Historie in all mens Lives,
(Rumor doth double, like the Voice, and Eccho,)
M-755 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Westermerland27 O my good Lord Mowbray,
(You speak (Lord Mowbray) now you know not what.)
M-756 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Westmerland28 Then (my Lord) Unto your Grace doe I in chiefe addresse
(Into the harsh and boystrous Tongue of Warre?)
W-730 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Doll (Teare-sheet)20 (prose) Charge me? I scorne you (scurvie Companion)
(Away you Cut-purse Rascall, you filthy Bung/Captaine? thou abhominable damn’d Cheater,)
W-731 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Hostesse (Mistresse Quickly)17 (prose) I am undone with his going: I warrant he is an
(NULL)
W-732 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Hostesse (Mistresse Quickly)25 (prose) Oh my most worshipfull Lord, and't please your
(make mee my Lady thy wife. Canst thou deny it?)
W-733 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Lady Percie37 Oh yet, for heavens sake, go not to these Warrs;
(NULL)
G-760 Henry the Fift Boy26 (prose) As young as I am, I have observ’d these three
(NULL)
G-761 Henry the Fift Chorus42 Now all the Youth of England are on fire,
(NULL)
G-762 Henry the Fift Chorus53 Now entertaine conjecture of a time,
(NULL)
G-763 Henry the Fift Chorus34 O For a Muse of Fire, that would ascend
(NULL)
G-764 Henry the Fift Chorus14 Thus farre with rough, and all-unable Pen,
(NULL)
G-765 Henry the Fift Chorus35 Thus with imagin'd wing our swift Scene flyes,
(NULL)
G-766 Henry the Fift Chorus45 Vouchsafe to those that have not read the Story,
(NULL)
M-760 Henry the Fift Archbishop of Canterbury63 Then heare me gracious Soveraign, and you Peers,
(No Woman shall succeed in Salike Land:)
M-761 Henry the Fift Archbishop of Canterbury38 Therefore doth heaven divide
(Without defeat. Therefore to France, my Liege,)
M-762 Henry the Fift Burgogne45 My dutie to you both, on equall love.
(Why that the naked, poore, and mangled Peace,)
M-763 Henry the Fift Exeter26 In which array (brave Soldier) doth he lye,
(Suffolke first dyed, and Yorke all hagled over)
M-764 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)16 Call in the Messengers sent from the Dolphin.
(NULL)
M-765 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)28 God quit you in his mercy: Hear your sentence
(NULL)
M-766 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)43 How yet resolves the Governour of the Towne?
(What Reyne can hold licentious Wickednesse,)
M-767 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)37 I pray thee beare my former Answer back:
(Marke then abounding valour in our English:)
M-768 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)61 Indeede the French may lay twentie French
(And what art thou, thou Idoll Ceremonie?/Upon the King, let us our Lives, our Soules,)
M-769 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)36 (prose) Marry, if you would put me to Verses, or to
(NULL)
M-770 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)27 (prose) Now fye upon my false French: by mine Honor
(in true English, I love thee Kate; by which Honor,)
M-771 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)18 O God of Battailes, steele my Souldiers hearts,
(NULL)
M-772 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)35 Once more unto the Breach,
(NULL)
M-773 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)66 The mercy that was quicke in us but late,
(If that same Daemon that hath gull’d thee thus,)
M-774 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)27 This day is call'd the Feast of Crispian:
(We few, we happy few, we band of brothers:)
M-775 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)28 Thou doo’st thy Office fairely. Turne thee backe,
(Goe therefore tell thy Master, heere I am;)
M-776 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)31 Upon the King, let us our Lives, our Soules,
(And what art thou, thou Idoll Ceremonie?)
M-777 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)30 We are glad the Dolphin is so pleasant with us,
(NULL)
M-778 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)49 What's he that wishes so?
(This day is call'd the Feast of Crispian:/We few, we happy few, we band of brothers:)
W-760 Henry the Fift Hostesse (Mistresse Quickly)16 (prose) Nay sure, hee's not in Hell: hee’s in Arthurs Bosome,
(NULL)
G-790 The first Part of Henry the Sixt John Talbot20 Is my name Talbot? and am I your Sonne?
(NULL)
G-791 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Third Messenger37 My gracious Lords, to adde to your laments,
(NULL)
M-790 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Charles (Dolphin)22 Divinest Creature, Astrea’s Daughter,
(’Tis Joane, not we, by whom the day is wonne:)
M-791 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Generall27 Thou ominous and fearefull Owle of death,
(NULL)
M-792 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)19 Presumptuous Priest, this place comands my patience,
(Thy lewd, pestiferous, and dissentious prancks,)
M-793 The first Part of Henry the Sixt John Talbot20 Is my name Talbot? and am I your Sonne?
(NULL)
M-794 The first Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)40 Come hither you that would be Combatants:
(NULL)
M-795 The first Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)23 Whether it be through force of your report,
(NULL)
M-796 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Mortimer32 I will, if that my fading breath permit,
(I was the next by Birth and Parentage:)
M-797 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Mortimer29 Kind Keepers of my weake decaying Age,
(Poore Gentleman, his wrong doth equall mine.)
M-798 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Suffolke31 A Dowre my Lords? Disgrace not so your King,
(NULL)
M-799 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot21 My thoughts are whirled like a Potters Wheele,
(NULL)
M-800 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot41 Saint George, and Victory; fight Souldiers, fight:
(When from the Dolphins Crest thy Sword struck fire,/Thou Icarus, thy Life to me is sweet:)
M-801 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot21 Shame to the Duke of Burgundy, and thee:
(When first this Order was ordain’d my Lords,)
M-802 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot25 What chance is this, that suddenly hath crost us?
(NULL)
M-803 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot31 Where is my other Life? mine owne is gone.
(O thou whose wounds become hard favoured death,)
M-804 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Third Messenger37 My gracious Lords, to adde to your laments,
(NULL)
W-790 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Countesse27 The Plot is layd, if all things fall out right,
(It cannot be, this weake and writhled shrimpe)
W-791 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)34 Brave Burgonie, undoubted hope of France,
(Looke on thy Country, look on fertile France,)
W-792 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)21 Dolphin, I am by birth a Shepheards Daughter,
(NULL)
W-793 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)24 First let me tell you whom you have condemn'd; (Extended)
(NULL)
W-794 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)29 The Regent conquers, and the Frenchmen flye.
(NULL)
G-810 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Young Clifford35 Shame and Confusion all is on the rout,
(NULL)
M-810 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Cade23 (prose) Well, hee shall be beheaded for it ten times:
(I am the Beesome that must sweepe the Court cleane of such filth as thou art:)
M-811 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Clifford27 What say ye Countrimen, will ye relent
(Is Cade the sonne of Henry the fift,)
M-812 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)30 Ah gracious Lord, these dayes are dangerous:
(Vertue is choakt with foule Ambition,)
M-813 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)29 Brave Peeres of England, Pillars of the State,
(To you Duke Humfrey must unload his greefe:)
M-814 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Hume21 Hume must make merry with the Duchesse Gold:
(Dame Elianor gives Gold, to bring the Witch:)
M-815 The second Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)25 I Margaret: my heart is drown'd with griefe,
(NULL)
M-816 The second Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)17 What, doth my Lord of Suffolke comfort me?
(NULL)
M-817 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Lieutenant34 Poole, Sir Poole? Lord,
(Now will I dam up this thy yawning mouth,)
M-818 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Salisbury25 Pride went before, Ambition followes him.
(Warwicke my sonne, the comfort of my age,)
M-819 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Salisbury28 Sirs stand apart, the King shall know your minde.
(NULL)
M-820 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Say28 Heare me but speake, and beare mee wher’e you will:
(Tell me: wherein have I offended most?)
M-821 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Suffolke26 A plague upon them: wherefore should I cursse them?
(NULL)
M-822 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Suffolke25 Thus is poore Suffolke ten times banished,
(If I depart from thee, I cannot live,)
M-823 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke24 As surely as my soule intends to live
(I do beleeve that violent hands/See how the blood is setled in his face.)
M-824 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)46 Anjou and Maine are given to the French,
(A day will come, when Yorke shall claime his owne,)
M-825 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)19 How now? is Somerset at libertie?
(False King, why hast thou broken faith with me,)
M-826 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)24 Now Yorke, or never, steele thy fearfull thoughts,
(NULL)
M-827 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Young Clifford35 Shame and Confusion all is on the rout,
(NULL)
W-810 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Elianor38 Come you, my Lord, to see my open shame?
(Ah Gloster, teach me to forget my selfe:)
W-811 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Elianor27 Why droopes my Lord like over-ripen'd Corn,
(NULL)
W-812 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret49 Be woe for me, more wretched then he is.
(NULL)
W-813 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret17 Beside the haughtie Protector, have we Beauford
(As that prowd Dame, the Lord Protectors Wife:)
W-814 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret38 Can you not see? Or will ye not observe
(NULL)
W-815 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret22 Enough sweet Suffolke, thou torment’st thy selfe,
(Oh, let me intreat thee cease, give me thy hand,)
W-816 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret23 My Lord of Suffolke, say, is this the guise?
(NULL)
G-830 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke Messenger21 Ah, one that was a wofull looker on,
(By many hands your Father was subdu’d,)
M-830 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Clarence (George)22 Father of Warwicke, know you what this meanes?
(NULL)
M-831 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Clifford29 Heere burnes my Candle out; I, heere it dies,
(NULL)
M-832 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Clifford34 My gracious Liege, this too much lenity
(The smallest Worme will turne, being troden on,)
M-833 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Edward (King Edward)24 A wispe of straw were worth a thousand Crowns,
(For what hath broach’d this tumult but thy Pride?)
M-834 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Edward (King Edward)30 Once more we sit in Englands Royall Throne,
(Come hither Besse, and let me kisse my Boy:)
M-835 The third Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)24 Hadst thou bin kill'd, when first thou didst presume,
(NULL)
M-836 The third Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)27 My Queene and Son are gone to France for aid:
(NULL)
M-837 The third Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)54 This battell fares like to the mornings Warre
(NULL)
M-838 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Richard72 I, Edward will use Women honourably:
(Would he were wasted, Marrow, Bones, and all,)
M-839 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Richard33 What? will the aspiring blood of Lancaster
(NULL)
M-840 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Son22 Ill blowes the winde that profits no body,
(Who’s this? Oh God! It is my Fathers face,)
M-841 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke24 Ah, who is nigh? come to me, friend, or foe,
(NULL)
M-842 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke37 Ten dayes ago, I drown'd these newes in teares.
(NULL)
M-843 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke24 Then gentle Clarence, welcome unto Warwicke,
(NULL)
M-844 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke29 Why therefore Warwick came to seek you out,
(For King of England shalt thou be proclaim'd)
M-845 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)41 Shee-Wolfe of France,
(NULL)
M-846 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)26 The Army of the Queene hath got the field:
(NULL)
M-847 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke Messenger21 Ah, one that was a wofull looker on,
(By many hands your Father was subdu’d,)
W-830 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret43 Brave Warriours, Clifford and Northumberland
(What, was it you that would be Englands King?)
W-831 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret27 Enforc't thee? Art thou King, and wilt be forc't?
(NULL)
W-832 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret38 Great Lords, wise men ne'r sit and waile their losse,
(NULL)
W-833 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret24 King Lewis, and Lady Bona, heare me speake,
(Peace impudent, and shamelesse Warwicke,)
W-834 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret30 Looke Yorke, I stayn'd this Napkin with the blood
(NULL)
W-835 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret28 No, mightie King of France: now Margaret
(But now mischance hath trod my Title downe,)
W-836 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret28 Oh Ned, sweet Ned, speake to thy Mother Boy.
(Nay, never beare me hence, dispatch me heere:)
W-837 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret38 Who can be patient in such extreames?
(Enforc't thee? Art thou King, and wilt be forc't?)
G-850 Richard the Third Prince Edward21 Good Lords, make all the speedie hast you may.
(NULL)
M-850 Richard the Third Buckingham26 Hastings, and Edwards children, Gray and Rivers,
(Why then Al-soules day, is my bodies doomsday)
M-851 Richard the Third Buckingham24 Know then, it is your fault, that you resigne
(In this just Cause come I to move your Grace.)
M-852 Richard the Third Buckingham28 My Lord, this argues Conscience in your Grace,
(Refuse not, mightie Lord, this proffer’d love.)
M-853 Richard the Third Clarence (George)30 No, no, my Dreame was lengthen’d after life.
(Ah Keeper, Keeper, I have done these things)
M-854 Richard the Third Clarence (George)31 O, I have past a miserable night.
(Me thoughts that I had broken from the Tower,)
M-855 Richard the Third Hastings25 Woe, woe for England, not a whit for me,
(O bloody Richard: miserable England,)
M-856 Richard the Third King Edward (IV)33 Have I a tongue to doome my Brothers death?
(NULL)
M-857 Richard the Third Prince Edward21 Good Lords, make all the speedie hast you may.
(NULL)
M-858 Richard the Third Richard37 A thing devised by the Enemy.
(March on, joyne bravely, let us too't pell mell,)
M-859 Richard the Third Richard21 As I entend to prosper, and repent:
(NULL)
M-860 Richard the Third Richard30 Give me another Horse, bind up my Wounds:
(NULL)
M-861 Richard the Third Richard23 Goe after, after, Cousin Buckingham.
(Tell them, how Edward put to death a Citizen,)
M-862 Richard the Third Richard18 He cannot live I hope, and must not dye,
(NULL)
M-863 Richard the Third Richard37 I cannot tell, if to depart in silence,
(Alas, why would you heape this Care on me?)
M-864 Richard the Third Richard46 Looke what is done, cannot be now amended:
(And by that losse, your Daughter is made Queene.)
M-865 Richard the Third Richard39 Now is the Winter of our Discontent,
(NULL)
M-866 Richard the Third Richard31 Those eyes of thine, from mine have drawne salt Teares;
(Loe heere I lend thee this sharpe-pointed Sword,)
M-867 Richard the Third Richard37 Was ever woman in this humour woo'd?
(NULL)
M-868 Richard the Third Richmond27 Interre their Bodies, as become their Births,
(We will unite the White Rose, and the Red.)
M-869 Richard the Third Richmond35 Why then ’tis time to Arme, and give direction.
(More then I have said, loving Countrymen,)
M-870 Richard the Third Scrivener14 Here is the Indictment of the good Lord Hastings,
(NULL)
M-871 Richard the Third Stanley (Derby)21 Fortune, and Victory sit on thy Helme.
(NULL)
M-872 Richard the Third Tyrrel22 The tyrannous and bloudie Act is done,
(NULL)
W-850 Richard the Third Duchesse of Yorke25 Ah so much interest have I in thy sorrow,
(NULL)
W-851 Richard the Third Duchesse of Yorke26 No by the holy Rood, thou know’st it well,
(Either thou wilt die, by Gods just ordinance)
W-852 Richard the Third Lady Anne28 And I with all unwillingnesse will goe.
(NULL)
W-853 Richard the Third Lady Anne32 Set downe, set downe your honourable load,
(NULL)
W-854 Richard the Third Lady Anne25 What do you tremble? are you all affraid?
(Foule Divell, For Gods sake hence, and trouble us not,)
W-855 Richard the Third Queene Elizabeth18 Ah! who shall hinder me to waile and weepe?
(To make an act of Tragicke violence.)
W-856 Richard the Third Queene Elizabeth20 Heavens wrong is most of all:
(NULL)
W-857 Richard the Third Queene Margaret19 And leave out thee? stay Dog, for thou shalt heare me.
(NULL)
W-858 Richard the Third Queene Margaret18 Beare with me: I am hungry for revenge,
(Richard yet lives, Hels blacke Intelligencer,)
W-859 Richard the Third Queene Margaret34 I call'd thee then, vaine flourish of my fortune:
(NULL)
W-860 Richard the Third Queene Margaret27 What? were you snarling all before I came,
(NULL)
G-880 King Henry the Eight Griffith (Gentleman Usher)21 This Cardinall,
(Though from an humble Stocke, undoubtedly)
G-881 King Henry the Eight Prologue32 I Come no more to make you laugh, Things now,
(NULL)
M-880 King Henry the Eight Buckingham26 All good people,
(I have this day receiv'd a Traitors judgement,)
M-881 King Henry the Eight Buckingham37 Nay, Sir Nicholas,
(Let it alone; my State now will but mocke me.)
M-882 King Henry the Eight Buckingham26 Pray give me favour Sir: This cunning Cardinall
(Does buy and sell his Honour as he pleases,)
M-883 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey30 Cromwel, I did not thinke to shed a teare
(Cromwel, I charge thee, fling away Ambition,)
M-884 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey22 I do professe
(I have no Spleene against you, nor injustice)
M-885 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey23 So farewell, to the little good you beare me.
(Farewell? A long farewell to all my Greatnesse.)
M-886 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey25 What should this meane?
(Farewell? A long farewell to all my Greatnesse.)
M-887 King Henry the Eight Cranmer43 Let me speake Sir,
(This Royall Infant, Heaven still move about her;)
M-888 King Henry the Eight Cranmer29 My good Lords; Hitherto, in all the Progresse
(Lay all the weight ye can upon my patience,)
M-889 King Henry the Eight Griffith (Gentleman Usher)25 Noble Madam: Mens evill manners, live in Brasse, their Vertues
(This Cardinall, Though from an humble Stocke,)
M-890 King Henry the Eight King Henry (VIII)56 My Lord Cardinall,
(I doe excuse you; yea, upon mine Honour,)
M-891 King Henry the Eight King Henry (VIII)43 Pray you arise
(What manner of man are you? /Your Enemies are many, and not small; their practises)
M-892 King Henry the Eight King Henry (VIII)26 You were ever good at sodaine Commendations,
(No Sir, it doe’s not please me,)
M-893 King Henry the Eight Norfolke26 Then you lost
(The view of earthly glory: Men might say)
M-894 King Henry the Eight Porter Man20 (prose) The Spoones will be the bigger Sir: There is
(Fire-Drake did I hit three times on the head,)
M-895 King Henry the Eight Surveyor31 Not long before your Highnesse sped to France,
(The Monke might be deceiv’d, and that ’twas dangerous)
M-896 King Henry the Eight Third Gentleman33 As well as I am able. The rich streame
(At length, her Grace rose, and with modest paces)
W-880 King Henry the Eight Anne Bullen24 Not for that neither; here’s the pang that pinches.
(I sweare, tis better to be lowly borne,)
W-881 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine29 In which I have commended to his goodnesse
(The Modell of our chaste loves: his yong daughter,)
W-882 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine17 My Lord, My Lord, I am a simple woman, much too weake
(NULL)
W-883 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine45 Sir, I desire you do me Right and Justice,
(In what have I offended you? What cause)
W-884 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine24 To betray me.
(That any English man dare give me Councell?)
W-885 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine22 Would I had never trod this English Earth,
(You know I am a Woman, lacking wit)
W-886 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine29 Ye turne me into nothing. Woe upon ye,
(Put my sicke cause into his hands, that hates me?)