Friendly Folio - Speeches

Code Play Character Lines First Line  
M-798 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Suffolke31 A Dowre my Lords? Disgrace not so your King,
(NULL)
M-123 As you Like it Jaques23 A Foole, a foole: I met a foole i'th Forrest,
(NULL)
M-650 King John Bastard (Philip)40 A foot of Honor better then I was,
(Well, now can I make any Joane a Lady,)
M-244 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Lysander20 A good perswasion; therefore heare me Hermia,
(Helen, to you our mindes we will unfold,)
M-308 Troylus and Cressida Pandarus21 A goodly medecine, for mine aking bones: oh world,
(NULL)
M-145 The Comedie of Errors Father (Egeon)64 A heavier taske could not have beene impos’d,
(NULL)
M-685 Richard the Second King Richard (II)30 A King of Beasts indeed: if ought but Beasts,
(NULL)
M-656 King John Dolphin (Lewis)29 A noble temper dost thou shew in this,
(Let me wipe off this honourable dewe,)
M-821 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Suffolke26 A plague upon them: wherefore should I cursse them?
(NULL)
M-618 The Tempest Prospero30 A solemne Ayre, and the best comforter,
(Holy Gonzallo, Honourable man,)
M-858 Richard the Third Richard37 A thing devised by the Enemy.
(March on, joyne bravely, let us too't pell mell,)
W-160 Loves Labour's lost Princesse25 A time me thinkes too short,
(NULL)
W-650 King John Constance27 A wicked day, and not a holy day.
(You have beguil'd me with a counterfeit)
M-833 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Edward (King Edward)24 A wispe of straw were worth a thousand Crowns,
(For what hath broach’d this tumult but thy Pride?)
M-615 The Tempest Ferdinand27 Admir'd Miranda,
(Indeede the top of Admiration, worth/I am, in my condition;)
M-812 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)30 Ah gracious Lord, these dayes are dangerous:
(Vertue is choakt with foule Ambition,)
W-850 Richard the Third Duchesse of Yorke25 Ah so much interest have I in thy sorrow,
(NULL)
W-100 All's Well, that Ends Well Countesse23 Ah what sharpe stings are in her mildest words?
(What Angell shall; My heart is heavie, and mine age is weake,)
W-855 Richard the Third Queene Elizabeth18 Ah! who shall hinder me to waile and weepe?
(To make an act of Tragicke violence.)
G-830 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke Messenger21 Ah, one that was a wofull looker on,
(By many hands your Father was subdu’d,)
M-847 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke Messenger21 Ah, one that was a wofull looker on,
(By many hands your Father was subdu’d,)
M-360 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony22 Ah, thou Spell! Avaunt.
(NULL)
M-841 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke24 Ah, who is nigh? come to me, friend, or foe,
(NULL)
W-501 Othello Desdemona17 Alas Iago,
(What shall I do to win my Lord againe?)
W-402 Hamlet Ophelia24 Alas my Lord, I have beene so affrighted.
(My Lord, as I was sowing in my Chamber,)
M-531 Romeo and Juliet Romeo25 Alas that love, whose view is muffled still,
(NULL)
W-400 Hamlet Queene (Gertrude)16 Alas, how is't with you?
(This is the very coynage of your Braine,)
W-123 As you Like it Rosalind18 Alas, what danger will it be to us,
(NULL)
M-880 King Henry the Eight Buckingham26 All good people,
(I have this day receiv'd a Traitors judgement,)
G-610 The Tempest Ariel25 All haile, great Master, grave Sir, haile: I come
(NULL)
M-361 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony21 All is lost,
(This foule Egyptian hath betrayed me:)
M-380 Coriolanus Auffidius30 All places yeelds to him ere he sits downe,
(So hated, and so banish’d: but he ha’s a Merit)
M-611 The Tempest Caliban17 All the infections that the Sunne suckes up
(NULL)
M-124 As you Like it Jaques28 All the world's a stage,
(NULL)
M-382 Coriolanus Brutus18 All tongues speake of him, and the bleared sights
(NULL)
M-576 Cymbeline Iachimo41 All too soone I shall,
(Your daughters Chastity, (there it beginnes))
M-601 Pericles Pericles23 An Armor, friends, I pray you let me see it.
(NULL)
W-852 Richard the Third Lady Anne28 And I with all unwillingnesse will goe.
(NULL)
W-857 Richard the Third Queene Margaret19 And leave out thee? stay Dog, for thou shalt heare me.
(NULL)
W-144 The Comedie of Errors Luciana28 And may it be that you have quite forgot
(NULL)
M-245 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Lysander27 And run through fire I will for thy sweet sake.
(NULL)
W-340 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia27 And she shall thanke you for't, if ere you know her.
(A vertuous gentlewoman, milde, and beautifull.)
M-202 The Merchant of Venice Arragon34 And so have I addrest me, fortune now
(NULL)
M-311 Troylus and Cressida Troylus19 And sodainely, where injurie of chance
(Our lockt embrasures; strangles our deare vowes,)
W-140 The Comedie of Errors Abbesse (Æmilia)19 And thereof came it, that the man was mad.
(The venome clamors of a jealous woman,)
M-502 Othello Iago29 And what's he then,
(That saies I play the Villaine?)
W-124 As you Like it Rosalind29 And why I pray you? who might be your mother
(NULL)
M-350 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Valentine18 And why not death, rather then living torment?
(NULL)
M-824 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)46 Anjou and Maine are given to the French,
(A day will come, when Yorke shall claime his owne,)
M-400 Hamlet Player King (First Player)29 Anon he findes him,
(NULL)
M-401 Hamlet Player King (First Player)45 Anon he findes him, (Extended)
(NULL)
M-368 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cæsar (Octavius)22 Anthony, Leave thy lascivious Vassailes. When thou once
(NULL)
M-619 The Tempest Prospero23 As great to me, as late, and supportable
(In this last Tempest. I perceive these Lords)
M-859 Richard the Third Richard21 As I entend to prosper, and repent:
(NULL)
M-128 As you Like it Orlando24 (prose) As I remember Adam, it was upon this fashion
(NULL)
M-344 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus20 As much as I can doe, I will effect:
(Say that upon the altar of her beauty)
M-823 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke24 As surely as my soule intends to live
(I do beleeve that violent hands/See how the blood is setled in his face.)
M-896 King Henry the Eight Third Gentleman33 As well as I am able. The rich streame
(At length, her Grace rose, and with modest paces)
M-612 The Tempest Caliban19 As wicked dewe, as ere my mother brush'd
(I must eat my dinner: This Island's mine by Sycorax my mother,)
G-760 Henry the Fift Boy26 (prose) As young as I am, I have observ’d these three
(NULL)
M-252 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Flute16 Asleepe my Love? What, dead my Dove?
(NULL)
W-200 The Merchant of Venice Portia23 Away then, I am lockt in one of them,
(NULL)
W-570 Cymbeline Imogen15 Away, I do condemne mine eares, that have
(NULL)
M-184 Measure, For Measure Duke (Vincentio)28 Be absolute for death: either death or life
(NULL)
G-480 Macbeth Malcolme29 Be not offended:
(I thinke our Country sinkes beneath the yoake;/I grant him Bloody,)
M-490 Macbeth Malcolme29 Be not offended:
(I thinke our Country sinkes beneath the yoake;/I grant him Bloody,)
M-283 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio20 Be patient gentlemen, I choose her for my selfe,
(And kisse me Kate, we will be married a sonday.)
M-445 Julius Cæsar Brutus34 (prose) Be patient till the last.
(Romans, Countrey-men, and Lovers, heare mee)
W-812 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret49 Be woe for me, more wretched then he is.
(NULL)
W-858 Richard the Third Queene Margaret18 Beare with me: I am hungry for revenge,
(Richard yet lives, Hels blacke Intelligencer,)
M-613 The Tempest Caliban19 Beate him enough: after a little time
(Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custome with him)
M-508 Othello Othello23 Behold, I have a weapon:
(NULL)
W-813 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret17 Beside the haughtie Protector, have we Beauford
(As that prowd Dame, the Lord Protectors Wife:)
M-473 King Lear Lear34 Blow windes, and crack your cheeks; Rage, blow
(Rumble thy belly full: spit Fire, spowt Raine:)
W-300 Troylus and Cressida Cressida24 Boldnesse comes to mee now, and brings mee
(Hard to seeme won: but I was won my Lord)
W-791 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)34 Brave Burgonie, undoubted hope of France,
(Looke on thy Country, look on fertile France,)
M-813 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)29 Brave Peeres of England, Pillars of the State,
(To you Duke Humfrey must unload his greefe:)
W-830 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret43 Brave Warriours, Clifford and Northumberland
(What, was it you that would be Englands King?)
M-482 Macbeth Macbeth27 Bring them before us.
(To be thus, is nothing, but to be safely thus:)
W-440 Julius Cæsar Portia62 Brutus, my Lord.
(Nor for yours neither. Y'have ungently Brutus/Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall;/I graunt I am a Woman;)
M-200 The Merchant of Venice Anthonio18 But little: I am arm'd and well prepar'd.
(NULL)
M-161 Loves Labour's lost Berowne39 But Love first learned in a Ladies eyes,
(NULL)
M-706 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)33 But soft I pray you; did King Richard then
(Nay then I cannot blame his Cousin King)
M-651 King John Bastard (Philip)32 By all the bloud that ever fury breath'd,
(To whip this dwarfish warre, this Pigmy Armes)
M-652 King John Bastard (Philip)24 By heaven, these scroyles of Angiers flout you kings,
(Be friends a-while, and both conjoyntly bend)
W-301 Troylus and Cressida Cressida15 By the same token, you are a Bawd.
(Words, vowes, gifts, teares, and loves full sacrifice,)
G-320 Twelfe Night Sebastian24 (prose) By your patience, no: my starres shine darkely
(NULL)
M-327 Twelfe Night Sebastian24 (prose) By your patience, no: my starres shine darkely
(NULL)
W-241 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena13 Cal you me faire? that faire againe unsay,
(NULL)
M-764 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)16 Call in the Messengers sent from the Dolphin.
(NULL)
W-814 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret38 Can you not see? Or will ye not observe
(NULL)
M-205 The Merchant of Venice Clowne (Launcelet)28 (prose) Certainely, my conscience will serve me to run
(NULL)
W-730 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Doll (Teare-sheet)20 (prose) Charge me? I scorne you (scurvie Companion)
(Away you Cut-purse Rascall, you filthy Bung/Captaine? thou abhominable damn’d Cheater,)
M-581 Cymbeline Posthumus38 Close by the battell, ditch’d, and wall’d with turph,
(NULL)
M-794 The first Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)40 Come hither you that would be Combatants:
(NULL)
M-384 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)32 Come leave your teares: a brief farwel: the beast
(I shall be lov'd when I am lack'd. Nay Mother,)
M-553 Titus Andronicus Titus23 Come Marcus, come, kinsmen this is the way.
(Ah Rome! Well, well, I made thee miserable,)
M-172 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)20 Come sir, you blush: as his, your case is such,
(NULL)
W-810 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Elianor38 Come you, my Lord, to see my open shame?
(Ah Gloster, teach me to forget my selfe:)
M-552 Titus Andronicus Titus40 Come, come Lavinia, looke, thy Foes are bound,
(NULL)
M-630 The Winters Tale Antigonus44 Come, poore babe;
(NULL)
M-883 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey30 Cromwel, I did not thinke to shed a teare
(Cromwel, I charge thee, fling away Ambition,)
W-463 King Lear Gonerill19 Did my Father strike my Gentleman for chiding
(By day and night, he wrongs me, every howre)
M-686 Richard the Second King Richard (II)26 Discomfortable Cousin, knowest thou not,
(NULL)
M-790 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Charles (Dolphin)22 Divinest Creature, Astrea’s Daughter,
(’Tis Joane, not we, by whom the day is wonne:)
W-651 King John Constance29 Doe childe, goe to it grandame childe,
(Now shame upon you where she does or no;/Thou monstrous Injurer of heaven and earth,)
M-715 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal31 Doe not thinke so, you shall not finde it so:
(NULL)
M-144 The Comedie of Errors Dromio of Siracuse32 (prose) Doe you know me sir? Am I (Edited version)Dromio? Am I
(NULL)
M-143 The Comedie of Errors Dromio of Siracuse47 (prose) Doe you know me sir? Am I Dromio? Am I
(Marry sir, she's the Kitchin wench, and al grease,)
W-792 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)21 Dolphin, I am by birth a Shepheards Daughter,
(NULL)
M-480 Macbeth Captaine26 Doubtfull it stood,
(NULL)
W-831 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret27 Enforc't thee? Art thou King, and wilt be forc't?
(NULL)
W-815 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret22 Enough sweet Suffolke, thou torment’st thy selfe,
(Oh, let me intreat thee cease, give me thy hand,)
W-527 Romeo and Juliet Nurse36 (prose) Even or odde, of all daies in the yeare come
(NULL)
M-403 Hamlet Hamlet32 Extasie? My Pulse as yours doth temperately keepe time,
(O throw away the worser part of it,)
M-554 Titus Andronicus Titus42 Faint-harted boy, arise and looke upon her,
(Thou hast no hands to wipe away thy teares,)
W-223 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Quickly31 Fairies blacke, gray, greene, and white,
(About, about: Search Windsor Castle (Elves) within, and out.)
W-528 Romeo and Juliet Nurse14 Faith here it is,
(Romeo is banished, and all the world to nothing,)
W-571 Cymbeline Imogen33 False to his Bed? What is it to be false?
(NULL)
M-733 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe30 (prose) Fare you well, gentle Gentlemen. On Bardolph,
(How subject wee old men are to this vice of Lying?)
W-520 Romeo and Juliet Juliet35 Farewell: God knowes when we shall meete againe.
(NULL)
W-521 Romeo and Juliet Juliet45 Farewell: God knowes when we shall meete againe. (Extended)
(NULL)
M-830 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Clarence (George)22 Father of Warwicke, know you what this meanes?
(NULL)
G-570 Cymbeline Guiderius24 Feare no more the heate o'th'Sun, (chant)
(NULL)
G-570 Cymbeline Arviragus24 Feare no more the heate o'th'Sun, (chant)
(NULL)
M-472 King Lear Kent22 (prose) Fellow I know thee.
(A Knave, a Rascall, an eater of broken meates, a/What a brazen-fac’d Varlet art thou, to deny)
W-280 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine25 Fie, fie, unknit that thretaning unkinde brow,
(NULL)
W-281 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine44 Fie, fie, unknit that thretaning unkinde brow, (Extended)
(NULL)
W-680 Richard the Second Duchesse of Gloucester28 Findes brotherhood in thee no sharper spurre?
(NULL)
W-793 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)24 First let me tell you whom you have condemn'd; (Extended)
(NULL)
G-730 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Epilogue26 First, my Feare: then, my Curtsie: last, my Speech.
(NULL)
M-483 Macbeth Macbeth14 Fled to England?
(Time, thou anticipat'st my dread exploits:)
M-710 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)36 For all the World,
(Why, Harry, doe I tell thee of my Foes,)
M-660 King John King John28 For our advantage, therefore heare us first:
(The Canons have their bowels full of wrath,)
M-540 Titus Andronicus Aaron29 For shame be friends, and joyne for that you jar:
(NULL)
M-746 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Northumberland25 For this, I shall have time enough to mourne.
(And darknesse be the burier of the dead.)
M-716 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal24 For Wormes, brave Percy. Farewell great heart:
(NULL)
M-871 Richard the Third Stanley (Derby)21 Fortune, and Victory sit on thy Helme.
(NULL)
M-440 Julius Cæsar Antony35 Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears:
(NULL)
M-180 Measure, For Measure Angelo26 From thee: even from thy vertue.
(What's this? what's this? is this her fault, or mine?)
M-224 The Merry Wives of Windsor Fenton37 From time to time, I have acquainted you
(NULL)
M-243 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Egeus24 Full of vexation, come I, with complaint
(NULL)
W-522 Romeo and Juliet Juliet35 Gallop apace, you fiery footed steedes,
(NULL)
W-262 Much adoe about Nothing Margaret14 (prose) Get you some of this distill’d carduus benedictus
(NULL)
M-860 Richard the Third Richard30 Give me another Horse, bind up my Wounds:
(NULL)
W-360 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra33 Give me my Robe, put on my Crowne, I have
(NULL)
M-315 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses29 Give pardon to my speech:
(What glory our Achilles shares from Hector,)
W-481 Macbeth Lady Macbeth23 Glamys thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be
(NULL)
W-482 Macbeth Lady Macbeth40 Glamys thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be (Extended)
(NULL)
M-329 Twelfe Night Sir Toby21 (prose) Go sir Andrew: scout mee for him at the corner
(Now will not I deliver his Letter: for the behaviour)
M-653 King John Bastard (Philip)21 Go, beare him in thine armes:
(NULL)
M-220 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe18 (prose) Go, fetch me a quart of Sacke, put a tost in't.
(Come, let me poure in some Sack to the Thames water:)
M-765 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)28 God quit you in his mercy: Hear your sentence
(NULL)
M-522 Romeo and Juliet Capulet21 Gods bread, it makes me mad:
(NULL)
M-861 Richard the Third Richard23 Goe after, after, Cousin Buckingham.
(Tell them, how Edward put to death a Citizen,)
M-484 Macbeth Macbeth34 Goe bid thy Mistresse, when my drinke is ready,
(Is this a Dagger, which I see before me,)
M-738 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)31 Goe call the Earles of Surrey, and of Warwick:
(How many thousand of my poorest Subjects)
W-652 King John Constance26 Gone to be married? Gone to sweare a peace?
(NULL)
M-661 King John King John26 Good friend, thou hast no cause to say so yet,
(I had a thing to say, but let it goe:)
M-441 Julius Cæsar Antony21 Good Friends, sweet Friends, let me not stirre you up
(NULL)
W-161 Loves Labour's lost Princesse22 Good Lord Boyet, my beauty though but mean,
(NULL)
M-857 Richard the Third Prince Edward21 Good Lords, make all the speedie hast you may.
(NULL)
G-850 Richard the Third Prince Edward21 Good Lords, make all the speedie hast you may.
(NULL)
W-324 Twelfe Night Viola32 Good Madam, let me see your face.
(If I did love you in my masters flame)
M-664 King John King Philip29 Good reverend father, make my person yours,
(NULL)
G-120 As you Like it Le Beau22 Good Sir, I do in friendship counsaile you
(NULL)
M-126 As you Like it Le Beau22 Good Sir, I do in friendship counsaile you
(NULL)
M-602 Pericles Pericles40 Great King, Few love to hear the sins they love to act,
(How curtesie would seem to cover sin,/By your untimely claspings with your child,)
W-832 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret38 Great Lords, wise men ne'r sit and waile their losse,
(NULL)
M-632 The Winters Tale Leontes25 Ha' not you seene Camillo?
(Is whispering nothing?)
W-347 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Silvia17 Had I beene ceazed by a hungry Lion,
(When Protheus cannot love, where he’s belov’d:)
M-509 Othello Othello23 Had it pleas’d Heaven,
(I heere looke grim as hell.)
M-835 The third Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)24 Hadst thou bin kill'd, when first thou didst presume,
(NULL)
M-555 Titus Andronicus Titus27 Haile Rome:
(These that Survive, let Rome reward with Love:)
M-485 Macbeth Macbeth26 Hang out our Banners on the outward walls,
(She should have dy'de heereafter;/To morrow, and to morrow, and to morrow,)
M-225 The Merry Wives of Windsor Ford18 (prose) Has Page any braines? Hath he any eies? Hath he
(NULL)
M-850 Richard the Third Buckingham26 Hastings, and Edwards children, Gray and Rivers,
(Why then Al-soules day, is my bodies doomsday)
M-856 Richard the Third King Edward (IV)33 Have I a tongue to doome my Brothers death?
(NULL)
M-666 King John Meloone27 Have I not hideous death within my view,
(NULL)
W-480 Macbeth Hecat28 Have I not reason (Beldams) as you are?
(NULL)
W-541 Titus Andronicus Tamora25 Have I not reason thinke you to looke pale.
(NULL)
W-242 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena22 Have you not set Lysander, as in scorne
(I, doe, persever, counterfeit sad lookes,)
M-471 King Lear Gloucester18 (prose) He cannot bee such a Monster. Edmond seeke
(These late Eclipses in the Sun and Moone)
M-862 Richard the Third Richard18 He cannot live I hope, and must not dye,
(NULL)
M-590 Pericles Antiochus16 He hath found the meaning,
(NULL)
M-532 Romeo and Juliet Romeo24 He jeasts at Scarres that never felt a wound,
(But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?)
W-502 Othello Desdemona20 He saies he will returne incontinent,
(My Mother had a Maid call'd Barbarie)
M-468 King Lear Foole20 He that has and a little-tyne wit,
(This is a brave night to coole a Curtizan:)
M-385 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)22 He that will give good words to thee, wil flatter
(NULL)
M-264 Much adoe about Nothing Frier Francis15 Heare me a little, for I have onely bene silent so
(NULL)
M-820 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Say28 Heare me but speake, and beare mee wher’e you will:
(Tell me: wherein have I offended most?)
M-556 Titus Andronicus Titus26 Heare me grave fathers, noble Tribunes stay,
(Be pittifull to my condemned Sonnes,)
M-301 Troylus and Cressida Agamemnon27 Heare you Patroclus:
(If you doe say, we thinke him over proud,)
M-362 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony24 Hearke, the Land bids me tread no more upon't,
(I have fled my selfe, and have instructed cowards)
M-694 Richard the Second Yorke23 Heav'n for his mercy, what a tide of woes
(NULL)
M-711 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)64 Heaven pardon thee:
(Thy place in Councell thou hast rudely lost/He was but as the Cuckow is in June,)
W-856 Richard the Third Queene Elizabeth20 Heavens wrong is most of all:
(NULL)
M-831 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Clifford29 Heere burnes my Candle out; I, heere it dies,
(NULL)
M-520 Romeo and Juliet Benvolio23 Heere were the servants of your adversarie,
(Madam, an houre before the worshipt Sun)
W-249 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia12 Helpe me Lysander, helpe me; do thy best
(NULL)
M-510 Othello Othello43 Her Father lov'd me, oft invited me:
(NULL)
G-590 Pericles Gower40 Here have you seen a mighty King
(His child, I wis, to incest bring:)
M-593 Pericles Gower40 Here have you seen a mighty King
(His child, I wis, to incest bring:)
M-870 Richard the Third Scrivener14 Here is the Indictment of the good Lord Hastings,
(NULL)
M-492 Macbeth Porter19 (prose) Here's a knocking indeede: if a man were
(NULL)
M-624 The Tempest Trinculo24 (prose) Here's neither bush, nor shrub to beare off any
(NULL)
M-632 The Winters Tale Clowne22 (prose) Hilloa, loa.
(I have seene two such sights, by Sea and by Land:)
M-524 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence32 Hold then: goe home, be merrie, give consent,
(NULL)
M-525 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence27 Hold thy desperate hand:
(NULL)
M-526 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence51 Hold thy desperate hand: (Extended)
(NULL)
M-162 Loves Labour's lost Berowne24 Honest plain words, best pierce the ears of griefe
(NULL)
M-633 The Winters Tale Leontes18 How blest am I
(With violent Hefts: I have drunke, and seene the Spider.)
W-243 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena26 How happy some, ore other some can be?
(NULL)
M-571 Cymbeline Belarius30 How hard it is to hide the sparkes of Nature?
(These Boyes know little they are Sonnes to’th’King,)
W-341 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia18 How many women would doe such a message?
(NULL)
M-309 Troylus and Cressida Thersites20 (prose) How now Thersites? what lost in the Labyrinth of thy
(NULL)
M-825 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)19 How now? is Somerset at libertie?
(False King, why hast thou broken faith with me,)
M-503 Othello Iago19 How poore are they that have not Patience?
(NULL)
M-340 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Duke (of Milan)34 How shall I fashion me to weare a cloake?
(’Tis so: and heere’s the Ladder for the purpose.)
M-766 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)43 How yet resolves the Governour of the Towne?
(What Reyne can hold licentious Wickednesse,)
M-579 Cymbeline Pisanio23 How? of Adultery? Wherefore write you not
(NULL)
M-474 King Lear Lear22 Howle, howle, howle: O you are men of stones,
(NULL)
M-814 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Hume21 Hume must make merry with the Duchesse Gold:
(Dame Elianor gives Gold, to bring the Witch:)
M-129 As you Like it Orlando23 I almost die for food, and let me have it.
(NULL)
M-700 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe20 (prose) I am accurst to rob in that Theefe company: that
(NULL)
M-391 Coriolanus Menenius19 (prose) I am knowne to be a humorous Patritian,
(NULL)
M-573 Cymbeline Clotten24 (prose) I am neere to’th’place where they should meet,
(NULL)
M-745 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Morton31 I am sorry, I should force you to beleeve
(So did our Men, heavy in Hotspurres losse,)
W-731 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Hostesse (Mistresse Quickly)17 (prose) I am undone with his going: I warrant he is an
(NULL)
W-859 Richard the Third Queene Margaret34 I call'd thee then, vaine flourish of my fortune:
(NULL)
M-863 Richard the Third Richard37 I cannot tell, if to depart in silence,
(Alas, why would you heape this Care on me?)
G-881 King Henry the Eight Prologue32 I Come no more to make you laugh, Things now,
(NULL)
W-633 The Winters Tale Paulina26 I dare be sworne:
(These dangerous, unsafe Lunes i'th'King, beshrew them:)
W-610 The Tempest Miranda25 I do not know
(One of my sexe; no womans face remember,)
M-884 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey22 I do professe
(I have no Spleene against you, nor injustice)
M-160 Loves Labour's lost Armado18 (prose) I doe affect the very ground (which is base)
(NULL)
M-316 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses30 I doe not straine it at the position,
(NULL)
W-361 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra27 I dreampt there was an Emperor Anthony
(His legges bestrid the Ocean, his rear'd arme)
M-687 Richard the Second King Richard (II)29 I have been studying, how to compare
(NULL)
M-688 Richard the Second King Richard (II)65 I have been studying, how to compare (Extended)
(NULL)
M-102 All's Well, that Ends Well Clowne (Lavatch)32 (prose) I have beene Madam a wicked creature, as you
(Y'are shallow Madam in great friends, for the)
M-211 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke28 I have possest your grace of what I purpose,
(NULL)
M-460 King Lear Edgar21 I heard myselfe proclaim'd
(NULL)
M-447 Julius Cæsar Cassius42 I know that vertue to be in you Brutus,
(NULL)
M-260 Much adoe about Nothing Benedicke28 (prose) I know that, but I would have thee hence, and
(NULL)
M-748 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal25 I know thee not, old man: Fall to thy Prayers:
(NULL)
M-717 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal23 I know you all, and will a-while uphold
(Yet heerein will I imitate the Sunne,)
W-325 Twelfe Night Viola25 I left no Ring with her: what meanes this Lady?
(NULL)
M-574 Cymbeline Clotten28 (prose) I love, and hate her: for she’s Faire and Royall,
(Ile have this Secret from thy heart, or rip)
M-815 The second Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)25 I Margaret: my heart is drown'd with griefe,
(NULL)
M-449 Julius Cæsar Cæsar30 I must prevent thee Cymber:
(I could well be mov'd, if I were as you,)
M-286 The Taming of the Shrew Tranio25 I pray sir tel me, is it possible
(Nay, then ’tis time to stirre him from his trance:)
M-767 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)37 I pray thee beare my former Answer back:
(Marke then abounding valour in our English:)
M-266 Much adoe about Nothing Leonato30 I pray thee cease thy counsaile,
(NULL)
M-246 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Oberon20 I pray thee give it me.
(I know a banke where the wilde time blowes,)
W-380 Coriolanus Volumnia23 (prose) I pray you daughter sing, or expresse your selfe
(To a cruell Warre I sent him, from whence he return’d, his browes bound with Oake.)
W-466 King Lear Regan24 I pray you Father being weake, seeme so.
(I dare avouch it Sir, what fifty Followers?)
W-201 The Merchant of Venice Portia24 I pray you tarrie, pause a day or two
(NULL)
M-201 The Merchant of Venice Anthonio19 I pray you thinke you question with the Jew:
(I am a tainted Weather of the flocke,)
W-244 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena19 I pray you though you mocke me, gentlemen,
(Good Hermia, do not be so bitter with me,)
M-351 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Valentine16 I Protheus, but that life is alter'd now,
(NULL)
W-634 The Winters Tale Paulina27 I say she's dead: Ile sweare't. If word, nor oath
(NULL)
W-572 Cymbeline Imogen27 I see a mans life is a tedious one,
(NULL)
M-383 Coriolanus Cominius41 I shall lacke voyce: the deeds of Coriolanus
(NULL)
W-441 Julius Cæsar Portia21 I should not neede, if you were gentle Brutus.
(I graunt I am a Woman;)
M-610 The Tempest Anthonio18 I Sir: where lies that? If 'twere a kybe
(NULL)
M-404 Hamlet Hamlet34 I so, God buy'ye: Now I am alone.
(Oh what a Rogue and Pesant slave am I?)
M-405 Hamlet Hamlet57 I so, God buy'ye: Now I am alone. (Extended)
(Oh what a Rogue and Pesant slave am I?)
M-312 Troylus and Cressida Troylus36 I take to day a Wife, and my election
(NULL)
M-402 Hamlet Ghost48 I that incestuous, that adulterate Beast
(NULL)
G-630 The Winters Tale Time32 I that please some, try all: both joy and terror
(NULL)
M-732 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Chief Justice29 I then did use the Person of your Father:
(NULL)
M-221 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe15 (prose) I went to her (Master Broome) as you see, like a
(NULL)
M-363 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony32 I will o’re-take thee Cleopatra, and
(I have liv’d in such dishonour, that the Gods)
M-406 Hamlet Hamlet18 (prose) I will tell you why; so shall my anticipation
(What a piece of worke is a man!)
M-370 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Enobarbus30 I will tell you,
(The Barge she sate in, like a burnisht Throne)
M-796 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Mortimer32 I will, if that my fading breath permit,
(I was the next by Birth and Parentage:)
M-346 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus24 I will. Even as one heate, another heate expels,
(NULL)
M-103 All's Well, that Ends Well King (of France)25 I would I had that corporall soundnesse now,
(NULL)
W-121 As you Like it Phebe20 I would not be thy executioner,
(NULL)
M-734 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe39 (prose) I would you had but the wit: 'twere better
(They are generally Fooles, and Cowards;)
W-460 King Lear Cordelia22 I yet beseech your Majesty.
(The Jewels of our Father, with wash'd eies)
M-183 Measure, For Measure Claudio19 I, but to die, and goe we know not where,
(NULL)
M-838 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Richard72 I, Edward will use Women honourably:
(Would he were wasted, Marrow, Bones, and all,)
M-475 King Lear Lear20 I, every inch a King.
(NULL)
W-141 The Comedie of Errors Adriana37 I, I, Antipholus, looke strange and frowne,
(NULL)
M-345 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus31 I, I: and she hath offered to the doome
(Cease to lament for that thou canst not helpe,)
M-486 Macbeth Macbeth17 I, in the Catalogue ye goe for men,
(NULL)
M-541 Titus Andronicus Aaron21 I, that I had not done a thousand more:
(NULL)
W-611 The Tempest Miranda20 If by your Art (my deerest father) you have
(NULL)
M-212 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke18 If everie Ducat in sixe thousand Ducates
(What judgement shall I dread doing no wrong?)
M-701 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe37 (prose) If I be not asham’d of my Souldiers, I am a
(NULL)
W-326 Twelfe Night Viola13 If I did love you in my masters flame
(Make me a Willow Cabine at your gate,)
W-381 Coriolanus Volumnia25 If it be Honor in your Warres, to seeme
(Now it lyes you on to speake to th’people:)
M-487 Macbeth Macbeth28 If it were done, when 'tis done, then 'twer well,
(NULL)
M-325 Twelfe Night Duke (Orsino)22 If Musicke be the food of Love, play on,
(NULL)
M-170 Loves Labour's lost Boyet20 If my observation (which very seldome lies
(Why all his behaviours doe make their retire,)
M-364 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony19 If that thy Father live, let him repent
(NULL)
W-653 King John Constance23 If thou that bidst me be content, wert grim
(NULL)
M-249 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Quince35 If we offend, it is with our good will.
(NULL)
G-240 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)16 If we shadowes have offended,
(NULL)
M-442 Julius Cæsar Antony29 If you have teares, prepare to shed them now.
(NULL)
M-407 Hamlet Hamlet26 Ile be with you straight, goe a little before. (Quarto speech)
(How all occasions doe informe against me,)
M-735 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe25 (prose) Ile follow you, good Master Robert Shallow.
(I will devise matter enough out of this Shallow, to)
W-637 The Winters Tale Perdita30 Ile not put The Dible in earth, to set one slip of them:
(NULL)
M-476 King Lear Lear17 Ile tell thee: Life and death, I am asham'd
(Blastes and Fogges upon thee:)
M-840 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Son22 Ill blowes the winde that profits no body,
(Who’s this? Oh God! It is my Fathers face,)
M-594 Pericles Gower52 Imagine Pericles arriv’d at Tyre,
(Now to Marina bend your minde,)
G-591 Pericles Gower52 Imagine Pericles arriv’d at Tyre,
(Now to Marina bend your minde,)
M-702 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe17 (prose) Imbowell’d? If thou imbowell mee to day, Ile
(NULL)
M-595 Pericles Gower18 In Antiochus and his daughter, you have heard
(Of monstrous lust, the due and just reward:)
G-592 Pericles Gower18 In Antiochus and his daughter, you have heard
(Of monstrous lust, the due and just reward:)
G-300 Troylus and Cressida Prologue31 In Troy there lyes a Scene: From Isles of Greece
(NULL)
M-763 Henry the Fift Exeter26 In which array (brave Soldier) doth he lye,
(Suffolke first dyed, and Yorke all hagled over)
W-881 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine29 In which I have commended to his goodnesse
(The Modell of our chaste loves: his yong daughter,)
M-122 As you Like it First Forrest Lord38 Indeed my Lord The melancholy Jaques grieves at that,
(NULL)
M-768 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)61 Indeede the French may lay twentie French
(And what art thou, thou Idoll Ceremonie?/Upon the King, let us our Lives, our Soules,)
M-542 Titus Andronicus Aaron24 Indeede, I was their Tutor to instruct them
(NULL)
W-103 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena25 Inspired Merit so by breath is bard,
(NULL)
M-868 Richard the Third Richmond27 Interre their Bodies, as become their Births,
(We will unite the White Rose, and the Red.)
W-260 Much adoe about Nothing Beatrice17 (prose) Is a not approved in the height a villaine, that
(Princes and Counties! surelie a Princely testi-)
W-442 Julius Cæsar Portia27 Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall
(NULL)
W-443 Julius Cæsar Portia39 Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall (Extended)
(I graunt I am a Woman;)
G-790 The first Part of Henry the Sixt John Talbot20 Is my name Talbot? and am I your Sonne?
(NULL)
M-793 The first Part of Henry the Sixt John Talbot20 Is my name Talbot? and am I your Sonne?
(NULL)
M-582 Cymbeline Posthumus35 Is there no way for Men to be, but Women
(NULL)
W-202 The Merchant of Venice Portia29 Is your name Shylocke?
(The quality of mercy is not strain'd,)
W-125 As you Like it Rosalind21 (prose) It is not the fashion to see the Ladie the Epilogue:
(NULL)
M-511 Othello Othello23 It is the Cause, it is the Cause (my Soule)
(NULL)
M-669 King John Prince Henry19 It is too late, the life of all his blood
(Oh vanity of sicknesse: fierce extreames)
G-652 King John Prince Henry19 It is too late, the life of all his blood
(Oh vanity of sicknesse: fierce extreames)
M-446 Julius Cæsar Brutus25 It must be by his death: and for my part
(NULL)
M-719 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Worcester42 It pleas’d your Majesty, to turne your lookes
(For you, my staffe of Office did I breake)
M-744 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Lord Bardolfe34 It was (my Lord) who lin’d himself with hope,
(Hope gives not so much warrant, as Dispaire)
M-797 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Mortimer29 Kind Keepers of my weake decaying Age,
(Poore Gentleman, his wrong doth equall mine.)
W-833 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret24 King Lewis, and Lady Bona, heare me speake,
(Peace impudent, and shamelesse Warwicke,)
W-542 Titus Andronicus Tamora26 King, be thy thoughts Imperious like thy name.
(NULL)
M-851 Richard the Third Buckingham24 Know then, it is your fault, that you resigne
(In this just Cause come I to move your Grace.)
M-417 Hamlet King (Claudius)14 Laertes, I must common with your greefe,
(NULL)
M-173 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)23 Let Fame, that all hunt after in their lives,
(Our Court shall be a little Achademe,)
G-121 As you Like it Second Brother16 Let me have audience for a word or two:
(NULL)
M-130 As you Like it Second Brother16 Let me have audience for a word or two:
(NULL)
M-450 Julius Cæsar Cæsar21 Let me have men about me, that are fat,
(NULL)
M-561 Tymon of Athens Tymon41 Let me looke backe upon thee. Oh thou Wall,
(NULL)
M-206 The Merchant of Venice Gratiano26 Let me play the foole,
(There are a sort of men, whose visages)
M-887 King Henry the Eight Cranmer43 Let me speake Sir,
(This Royall Infant, Heaven still move about her;)
M-603 Pericles Pericles34 Let none disturb us:
(Here pleasures court mine eyes, and mine eyes shun them,)
M-730 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Archbishop of Yorke24 Let us on: And publish the occasion of our Armes.
(Past, and to Come, seemes best; things Present, worst)
M-207 The Merchant of Venice Lorenzo20 Let's in, and there expect their comming.
(How sweet the moone-light sleepes upon this banke,)
M-604 Pericles Pericles26 Like a bold champion I assume the listes,
(NULL)
M-461 King Lear Edgar19 List a breefe tale,
(Met I my Father with his bleeding Rings,)
W-245 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena28 Loe, she is one of this confederacy,
(NULL)
M-408 Hamlet Hamlet27 Looke heere upon this Picture, and on this,
(NULL)
M-864 Richard the Third Richard46 Looke what is done, cannot be now amended:
(And by that losse, your Daughter is made Queene.)
W-834 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret30 Looke Yorke, I stayn'd this Napkin with the blood
(NULL)
M-712 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)30 Lords, give us leave:
(Thy place in Councell thou hast rudely lost,)
M-322 Twelfe Night Malvolio37 (prose) M,O,A,I. This simulation is not as the former:
(NULL)
G-481 Macbeth Malcolme24 Macduff, this Noble passion
(NULL)
M-491 Macbeth Malcolme24 Macduff, this Noble passion
(NULL)
M-654 King John Bastard (Philip)38 Mad world, mad kings, mad composition:
(NULL)
M-323 Twelfe Night Malvolio17 Madam, you have done me wrong,
(Lady you have, pray you peruse that Letter.)
M-174 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)28 Madame, your father heere doth intimate,
(NULL)
M-596 Pericles Gower24 Marina thus the Brothel scapes, and chances
(NULL)
G-593 Pericles Gower24 Marina thus the Brothel scapes, and chances
(NULL)
W-224 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Quickly27 (prose) Marry this is the short, and the long of it: you
(Marry, she hath receiv’d your Letter: for the)
M-209 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)22 Marry well remembred,
(A kinder Gentleman treads not the earth,)
G-200 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)22 Marry well remembred,
(A kinder Gentleman treads not the earth,)
M-769 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)36 (prose) Marry, if you would put me to Verses, or to
(NULL)
M-682 Richard the Second Bishop of Carlile36 Mary, Heaven forbid.
(NULL)
W-142 The Comedie of Errors Adriana25 May it please your Grace, Antipholus my husband,
(NULL)
M-683 Richard the Second Gaunt38 Me thinkes I am a Prophet new inspir'd
(This royal Throne of Kings, this sceptered Isle)
M-488 Macbeth Macbeth23 Me thought I heard a voyce cry, Sleep no more:
(NULL)
M-736 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe24 (prose) Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at mee: the
(keepe Prince Harry in continuall Laughter,)
G-650 King John Arthur17 Mercie on me:
(NULL)
M-250 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Theseus20 More strange then true. I never may beleeve
(Lovers and mad men have such seething braines,)
W-630 The Winters Tale Hermione18 More then Mistresse of,
(NULL)
W-180 Measure, For Measure Isabella27 Most strange: but yet most truely wil I speake,
(Oh Prince, I conjure thee, as thou beleev'st)
M-386 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)20 Most sweet Voyces:
(NULL)
M-583 Cymbeline Posthumus27 Most welcome bondage; for thou art a way
(NULL)
M-689 Richard the Second King Richard (II)17 Mowbray, impartiall are our eyes and eares,
(Wrath-kindled Gentlemen be rul'd by me:)
G-651 King John Arthur20 Must you with hot Irons, burne out both mine eyes?
(Have you the heart? When your head did but ake,)
M-762 Henry the Fift Burgogne45 My dutie to you both, on equall love.
(Why that the naked, poore, and mangled Peace,)
M-591 Pericles Cleon47 My Dyonisia, shall we rest us here,
(This Tharsus, ore which I have the government,)
M-481 Macbeth Lenox25 My former Speeches,
(NULL)
M-888 King Henry the Eight Cranmer29 My good Lords; Hitherto, in all the Progresse
(Lay all the weight ye can upon my patience,)
M-832 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Clifford34 My gracious Liege, this too much lenity
(The smallest Worme will turne, being troden on,)
M-631 The Winters Tale Camillo28 My gracious Lord,
(If ever I were wilfull-negligent,)
M-347 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus28 My gracious Lord, that which I wold discover,
(Know (noble Lord) they have devis’d a meane)
G-791 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Third Messenger37 My gracious Lords, to adde to your laments,
(NULL)
M-804 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Third Messenger37 My gracious Lords, to adde to your laments,
(NULL)
M-421 Hamlet Polonius22 My Liege, and Madam, to expostulate
(Madam, I sweare I use no Art at all:)
M-422 Hamlet Polonius41 My Liege, and Madam, to expostulate (Extended)
(Madam, I sweare I use no Art at all:)
M-140 The Comedie of Errors Antipholus of Ephesus40 My Liege, I am advised what I say,
(NULL)
M-707 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)41 My Liege, I did deny no Prisoners.
(NULL)
M-890 King Henry the Eight King Henry (VIII)56 My Lord Cardinall,
(I doe excuse you; yea, upon mine Honour,)
W-816 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret23 My Lord of Suffolke, say, is this the guise?
(NULL)
M-241 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Demetrius17 My Lord, faire Helen told me of their stealth,
(NULL)
W-185 Measure, For Measure Mariana32 My Lord, I doe confesse I nere was married,
(NULL)
W-882 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine17 My Lord, My Lord, I am a simple woman, much too weake
(NULL)
M-658 King John Hubert21 My Lord, they say five Moones were seene to night:
(Old men, and Beldames, in the streets)
M-852 Richard the Third Buckingham28 My Lord, this argues Conscience in your Grace,
(Refuse not, mightie Lord, this proffer’d love.)
M-560 Tymon of Athens Alcibiades19 My Lords, then under favour, pardon me,
(NULL)
W-543 Titus Andronicus Tamora21 My lovely Aaron,
(NULL)
G-241 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)29 My Mistris with a monster is in love,
(NULL)
M-387 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)37 My name is Caius Martius, who hath done
(NULL)
M-836 The third Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)27 My Queene and Son are gone to France for aid:
(NULL)
M-799 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot21 My thoughts are whirled like a Potters Wheele,
(NULL)
M-100 All's Well, that Ends Well Bertram19 My wife my Leige? I shal beseech your highnes
(Pardon my gracious Lord: for I submit)
W-544 Titus Andronicus Tamora30 My worthy Lord if ever Tamora,
(The Gods of Rome for-fend,)
W-760 Henry the Fift Hostesse (Mistresse Quickly)16 (prose) Nay sure, hee's not in Hell: hee’s in Arthurs Bosome,
(NULL)
M-341 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Duke (of Milan)25 Nay then no matter: stay with me a while,
(No, trust me, She is peevish, sullen, froward,)
M-342 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Launce33 (prose) Nay, 'twill bee this howre ere I have done
(NULL)
W-382 Coriolanus Volumnia51 Nay, go not from us thus:
(That if thou conquer Rome, the benefit)
M-528 Romeo and Juliet Mercutio32 Nay, Ile conjure too.
(Romeo, Humours, Madman, Passion, Lover,)
M-881 King Henry the Eight Buckingham37 Nay, Sir Nicholas,
(Let it alone; my State now will but mocke me.)
M-222 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe34 (prose) Nay, you shall heare (Master Broome) what I
(NULL)
M-690 Richard the Second King Richard (II)23 Needs must I like it well: I weepe for joy
(Deere Earth, I doe salute thee with my hand,)
M-163 Loves Labour's lost Berowne23 Neither of either, I remit both twaine.
(I see the tricke on’t: Heere was a consent,)
W-591 Pericles Marina19 (prose) Neither of these are so bad as thou art, since
(NULL)
W-851 Richard the Third Duchesse of Yorke26 No by the holy Rood, thou know’st it well,
(Either thou wilt die, by Gods just ordinance)
W-126 As you Like it Rosalind14 (prose) No faith, die by Attorney: the poore world is
(NULL)
M-691 Richard the Second King Richard (II)34 No matter where; of comfort no man speake:
(NULL)
W-362 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra19 No more but in a Woman, and commanded
(NULL)
M-365 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony22 No more light Answeres:
(The cause of our Expedience to the Queene,)
W-282 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine14 No shame but mine, I must forsooth be forst
(NULL)
W-654 King John Constance20 No, I defie all Counsell, all redresse,
(No, no, I will not, having breath to cry:)
W-835 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret28 No, mightie King of France: now Margaret
(But now mischance hath trod my Title downe,)
W-655 King John Constance23 No, no, I will not, having breath to cry:
(I am not mad: this haire I teare is mine,)
M-853 Richard the Third Clarence (George)30 No, no, my Dreame was lengthen’d after life.
(Ah Keeper, Keeper, I have done these things)
M-616 The Tempest Ferdinand25 No, noble Mistris, 'tis fresh morning with me
(Admir'd Miranda,)
M-680 Richard the Second Bullingbrooke17 Noble Lord,
(Goe to the rude Ribs of that ancient Castle,)
M-681 Richard the Second Bullingbrooke30 Noble Lord, (Extended)
(Goe to the rude Ribs of that ancient Castle,)
M-889 King Henry the Eight Griffith (Gentleman Usher)25 Noble Madam: Mens evill manners, live in Brasse, their Vertues
(This Cardinall, Though from an humble Stocke,)
W-444 Julius Cæsar Portia20 Nor for yours neither. Y'have ungently Brutus
(NULL)
W-880 King Henry the Eight Anne Bullen24 Not for that neither; here’s the pang that pinches.
(I sweare, tis better to be lowly borne,)
M-895 King Henry the Eight Surveyor31 Not long before your Highnesse sped to France,
(The Monke might be deceiv’d, and that ’twas dangerous)
W-464 King Lear Gonerill18 Not only Sir this, your all-lycenc’d Foole,
(NULL)
M-737 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe23 (prose) Not so (my Lord) your ill Angell is light: but I
(My Lord, I was borne with a white head, and somthing a round belly.)
M-739 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)30 Nothing but well to thee, Thomas of Clarence.
(How chance thou art not with the Prince, thy Brother?)
W-342 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia25 Now (by my modesty) a goodly Broker:
(And yet I would I had ore-look'd the Letter;)
G-761 Henry the Fift Chorus42 Now all the Youth of England are on fire,
(NULL)
M-543 Titus Andronicus Aaron25 Now climbeth Tamora Olympus toppe,
(NULL)
G-762 Henry the Fift Chorus53 Now entertaine conjecture of a time,
(NULL)
M-770 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)27 (prose) Now fye upon my false French: by mine Honor
(in true English, I love thee Kate; by which Honor,)
W-250 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia23 Now I but chide, but I should use thee worse.
(Out dog, out cur, thou driv'st me past the bounds)
M-865 Richard the Third Richard39 Now is the Winter of our Discontent,
(NULL)
M-409 Hamlet Hamlet22 Now might I do it pat, now he is praying,
(NULL)
M-620 The Tempest Prospero20 Now my Charmes are all ore-throwne,
(NULL)
M-121 As you Like it Duke Senior17 Now my Coe-mates, and brothers in exile:
(NULL)
W-143 The Comedie of Errors Courtizan16 Now out of doubt Antipholus is mad,
(NULL)
M-164 Loves Labour's lost Berowne34 Now step I forth to whip hypocrisie.
(Not you by me, but I betrayed to you.)
M-597 Pericles Gower20 Now take we our way
(No vizor does become black villany,)
G-594 Pericles Gower20 Now take we our way
(No vizor does become black villany,)
G-242 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)20 Now the hungry Lyons rores,
(NULL)
M-826 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)24 Now Yorke, or never, steele thy fearfull thoughts,
(NULL)
M-598 Pericles Gower60 Now ysleep slaked hath the rout,
(And so to Sea; their vessell shakes,)
G-595 Pericles Gower60 Now ysleep slaked hath the rout,
(And so to Sea; their vessell shakes,)
M-166 Loves Labour's lost Berowne39 O 'tis more then neede.
(Have at you then affections men at armes,)
M-562 Tymon of Athens Tymon49 O blessed breeding Sun, draw from the earth
(NULL)
W-320 Twelfe Night Olivia18 O by your leave I pray you.
(Give me leave, beseech you: I did send,)
W-321 Twelfe Night Olivia30 O by your leave I pray you. (Extended)
(Give me leave, beseech you: I did send,/The clocke upbraides me with the waste of time:)
W-363 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra17 O Cæsar, what a wounding shame is this,
(NULL)
G-763 Henry the Fift Chorus34 O For a Muse of Fire, that would ascend
(NULL)
M-771 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)18 O God of Battailes, steele my Souldiers hearts,
(NULL)
M-557 Titus Andronicus Titus25 O heere I lift this one hand up to heaven,
(If there were reason for these miseries,)
M-242 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Demetrius16 O Helen, goddesse, nimph, perfect, divine,
(NULL)
W-246 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena15 O I am out of breath, in this fond chace,
(NULL)
M-443 Julius Cæsar Antony16 O mighty Cæsar! Dost thou lye so lowe?
(NULL)
W-461 King Lear Cordelia14 O my deere Father, restauratian hang
(NULL)
M-755 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Westermerland27 O my good Lord Mowbray,
(You speak (Lord Mowbray) now you know not what.)
W-700 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Lady Percie28 O my good Lord, why are you thus alone?
(NULL)
M-740 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)45 O my Sonne! Heaven put it in thy minde to take it hence,
(To thee, it shall descend with better Quiet,)
M-749 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal41 O pardon me (my Liege)
(NULL)
M-444 Julius Cæsar Antony22 O pardon me, thou bleeding peece of Earth:
(NULL)
M-575 Cymbeline Cymbeline22 O rare instinct!
(And when came you to serve our Romane Captive?)
M-477 King Lear Lear22 O reason not the need: our basest Beggers
(NULL)
W-523 Romeo and Juliet Juliet16 O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
(NULL)
M-504 Othello Iago27 O Sir content you.
(NULL)
M-667 King John Pandulph20 O Sir, when he shall heare of your approach,
(NULL)
W-247 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena17 O spight! O hell! I see you are all bent
(NULL)
M-203 The Merchant of Venice Bassanio27 O sweet Portia,
(Heere are a few of the unpleasant'st words)
M-529 Romeo and Juliet Mercutio35 (prose) O then I see Queene Mab hath beene with you:
(NULL)
W-462 King Lear Cordelia16 O thou good Kent,
(NULL)
W-104 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena20 O were that all, I thinke not on my father,
(NULL)
W-322 Twelfe Night Olivia12 O what a deale of scorne, lookes beautifull?
(NULL)
W-403 Hamlet Ophelia12 O what a Noble minde is heere o're-throwne?
(NULL)
M-165 Loves Labour's lost Berowne33 O, and I forsooth in love,
(NULL)
M-854 Richard the Third Clarence (George)31 O, I have past a miserable night.
(Me thoughts that I had broken from the Tower,)
M-185 Measure, For Measure Duke (Vincentio)19 Of Government, the properties to unfold,
(NULL)
W-162 Loves Labour's lost Rosaline26 Oft have I heard of you my Lord Berowne,
(NULL)
M-410 Hamlet Hamlet20 Oh all you host of Heaven! Oh Earth; what els?
(NULL)
W-364 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra17 Oh Charmion. Where think'st thou he is now?
(NULL)
M-131 As you Like it Silvius19 Oh Corin, that thou knew'st how I do love her.
(Thou hast not lov'd)
W-348 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Silvia26 Oh Eglamoure, thou art a Gentleman:
(NULL)
W-573 Cymbeline Imogen21 Oh for a Horse with wings: Hear'st thou Pisanio?
(NULL)
M-146 The Comedie of Errors Father (Egeon)39 Oh had the gods done so, I had not now
(NULL)
M-741 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)31 Oh Heaven, that one might read the Book of Fate,
(This Percie was the man, neerest my Soule,)
M-324 Twelfe Night Malvolio19 (prose) Oh ho, do you come neere me now: no worse
(NULL)
W-683 Richard the Second Queene19 Oh I am prest to death through want of speaking:
(Why do'st thou say, King Richard is depos'd,)
M-381 Coriolanus Auffidius35 Oh Martius, Martius;
(Each word thou hast spoke, hath weeded from my heart)
W-366 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Octavia16 Oh my good Lord,
(Beleeve not all, or if you must beleeve,)
W-732 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Hostesse (Mistresse Quickly)25 (prose) Oh my most worshipfull Lord, and't please your
(make mee my Lady thy wife. Canst thou deny it?)
M-418 Hamlet King (Claudius)37 Oh my offence is ranke, it smels to heaven,
(NULL)
W-836 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret28 Oh Ned, sweet Ned, speake to thy Mother Boy.
(Nay, never beare me hence, dispatch me heere:)
W-540 Titus Andronicus Lavinia31 Oh Tamora, thou bear'st a woman face.
(Doe this, and be a charitable murderer.)
M-411 Hamlet Hamlet31 Oh that this too, too solid Flesh would melt,
(NULL)
M-500 Othello Brabantio21 Oh thou foule Theefe,
(NULL)
M-282 The Taming of the Shrew Lucentio23 Oh Tranio, till I found it to be true,
(I found the effect of Love in idlenesse)
W-733 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Lady Percie37 Oh yet, for heavens sake, go not to these Warrs;
(NULL)
W-181 Measure, For Measure Isabella17 Oh you beast,
(NULL)
W-343 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia21 Oh, know'st thou not, his looks are my soules food?
(The more thou dam'st it up, the more it burnes:)
M-662 King John King John32 Oh, when the last accompt twixt heaven and earth
(Had’st thou but shooke thy head, or made a pause)
M-772 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)35 Once more unto the Breach,
(NULL)
M-834 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Edward (King Edward)30 Once more we sit in Englands Royall Throne,
(Come hither Besse, and let me kisse my Boy:)
G-731 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Rumour40 Open your Eares: For which of you will stop
(NULL)
M-320 Twelfe Night Anthonio24 Orsino: Noble sir,
(NULL)
W-105 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena14 Our remedies oft in our selves do lye,
(NULL)
W-253 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Titania26 Out of this wood, do not desire to goe,
(NULL)
W-240 A Midsommer Nights Dreame First Fairy23 Over hil, over dale, through bush, through briar,
(Either I mistake your shape and making quite,)
M-304 Troylus and Cressida Hector31 Paris and Troylus, you have both said well:
(If Helen then be wife to Sparta’s King)
M-265 Much adoe about Nothing Frier Francis43 Pause awhile:
(Marry this wel carried, shall on her behalfe,)
M-703 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe36 (prose) Peace good Pint-pot, peace good Tickle-braine.
(A goodly portly man yfaith, and a corpulent,)
W-302 Troylus and Cressida Cressida20 Perchance my Lord, I shew more craft then love,
(If I be false, or swerve a haire from truth,)
M-463 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)27 Perswade me to the murther of your Lordship,
(When I disswaded him from his intent,)
M-817 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Lieutenant34 Poole, Sir Poole? Lord,
(Now will I dam up this thy yawning mouth,)
M-882 King Henry the Eight Buckingham26 Pray give me favour Sir: This cunning Cardinall
(Does buy and sell his Honour as he pleases,)
M-891 King Henry the Eight King Henry (VIII)43 Pray you arise
(What manner of man are you? /Your Enemies are many, and not small; their practises)
M-792 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Gloucester (Duke Humfrey)19 Presumptuous Priest, this place comands my patience,
(Thy lewd, pestiferous, and dissentious prancks,)
M-818 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Salisbury25 Pride went before, Ambition followes him.
(Warwicke my sonne, the comfort of my age,)
M-547 Titus Andronicus Marcus28 Princes, that strive by Factions, and by Friends,
(Chosen Andronicus, Sur-named Pious,)
M-302 Troylus and Cressida Agamemnon30 Princes: What greefe hath set the Jaundies on your cheekes?
(NULL)
W-251 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia10 Puppet? why so? I, that way goes the game.
(NULL)
M-530 Romeo and Juliet Prince (Eskales)23 Rebellious Subjects, Enemies to peace,
(NULL)
M-551 Titus Andronicus Second Goth20 Renowned Lucius, from our troups I straid,
(I heard a childe cry underneath a wall:)
M-478 King Lear Lear25 Returne to her? and fifty men dismiss’d?
(I prythee Daughter do not make me mad,)
M-708 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)24 Revolted Mortimer?
(Three times they breath’d, and three times did they drink)
M-800 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot41 Saint George, and Victory; fight Souldiers, fight:
(When from the Dolphins Crest thy Sword struck fire,/Thou Icarus, thy Life to me is sweet:)
M-415 Hamlet Horatio28 Season your admiration for a while
(Two nights together, had these Gentlemen)
M-605 Pericles Pericles30 See where she comes, apparell’d like the Spring,
(To taste the fruite of yon celestiall tree,)
W-853 Richard the Third Lady Anne32 Set downe, set downe your honourable load,
(NULL)
W-254 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Titania17 Set your heart at rest,
(NULL)
W-524 Romeo and Juliet Juliet30 Shall I speake ill of him that is my husband?
(NULL)
M-388 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)25 Shall remaine?
(Shall? O God! but most unwise Patricians: why)
M-827 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Young Clifford35 Shame and Confusion all is on the rout,
(NULL)
G-810 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Young Clifford35 Shame and Confusion all is on the rout,
(NULL)
M-801 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot21 Shame to the Duke of Burgundy, and thee:
(When first this Order was ordain’d my Lords,)
W-344 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia23 She hath bin fairer (Madam) then she is,
(Therefore I know she is about my height,)
M-489 Macbeth Macbeth12 She should have dy'de heereafter;
(To morrow, and to morrow, and to morrow,)
M-349 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Speed22 (prose) Shee that your worship loves?
(Marry by these speciall markes: first, you have)
G-340 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Speed22 (prose) Shee that your worship loves?
(Marry by these speciall markes: first, you have)
M-845 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)41 Shee-Wolfe of France,
(NULL)
W-383 Coriolanus Volumnia32 Should we be silent and not speak, our Raiment
(Alas! how can we, for our Country pray?)
M-213 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke23 Signior Anthonio, many a time and oft
(NULL)
W-631 The Winters Tale Hermione33 Since what I am to say, must be but that
(NULL)
W-883 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine45 Sir, I desire you do me Right and Justice,
(In what have I offended you? What cause)
M-226 The Merry Wives of Windsor Ford26 (prose) Sir, I heare you are a Scholler: (I will be briefe
(I have long lov’d her, and I protest to you, bestowed)
M-516 Othello Rodorigo21 Sir, I will answere any thing. But I beseech you
(To the grosse claspes of a Lascivious Moore:)
W-632 The Winters Tale Hermione26 Sir, spare your Threats:
(NULL)
M-469 King Lear Foole32 Sirha, Ile teach thee a speech.
(Marke it Nuncle;/Why after I have cut the egge i'th'middle and)
M-705 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Gads-hill18 (prose) Sirra, if they meete not with Saint Nicholas Clarks,
(What talkest thou to me of the Hangman? If I)
M-819 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Salisbury28 Sirs stand apart, the King shall know your minde.
(NULL)
M-462 King Lear Edgar23 Sit you downe Father: rest you.
(NULL)
M-885 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey23 So farewell, to the little good you beare me.
(Farewell? A long farewell to all my Greatnesse.)
M-175 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)21 (prose) So it is besieged with sable coloured melancholie, I (letter)
(NULL)
M-668 King John Pandulph35 So mak'st thou faith an enemy to faith,
(NULL)
M-204 The Merchant of Venice Bassanio35 So may the outward showes be least themselves
(NULL)
M-655 King John Bastard (Philip)31 So on my soule he did, for ought he knew:
(But wherefore doe you droope? why looke you sad?/A cockred-silken wanton brave our fields,)
M-713 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry )IV)33 So shaken as we are, so wan with care,
(To chace these Pagans in those holy Fields,)
M-572 Cymbeline Belarius21 So sure as you, your Fathers: I (old Morgan)
(Heere are your Sonnes againe, and I must loose)
M-176 Loves Labour's lost Ferdinand (King of Navarre)19 So sweete a kisse the golden Sunne gives not,
(NULL)
M-186 Measure, For Measure Duke (Vincentio)38 So then you hope of pardon from Lord Angelo?
(Be absolute for death: either death or life)
W-182 Measure, For Measure Isabella21 So you must be the first that gives this sentence,
(Could great men thunder)
M-558 Titus Andronicus Titus43 So, so, now sit, and looke you eate no more
(Thou shalt not sighe nor hold thy stumps to heaven,)
M-512 Othello Othello20 Soft you; a word or two before you goe:
(I have done the State some service, and they know't:)
M-208 The Merchant of Venice Morrocho48 Some God direct my judgement, let me see,
(NULL)
M-366 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony22 Sometime we see a clowd that’s Dragonish,
(I made these warres for Egypt, and the Queene,)
M-544 Titus Andronicus Aaron24 Sooner this sword shall plough thy bowels up.
(My mistris is my mistris: this my selfe,)
M-412 Hamlet Hamlet34 (prose) Speake the Speech I pray you, as I pronounc'd
(NULL)
M-413 Hamlet Hamlet42 (prose) Speake the Speech I pray you, as I pronounc'd (Extended)
(NULL)
M-262 Much adoe about Nothing Claudio27 Sweet Prince, you learn me noble thankfulnes:
(Give not this rotten Orenge to your friend,)
M-141 The Comedie of Errors Antipholus of Siracuse24 Sweete Mistris, what your name is else I know not;
(NULL)
M-105 All's Well, that Ends Well Parrolles28 (prose) Ten a clocke: Within these three houres ’twill
(What the divell should move mee to undertake)
M-842 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke37 Ten dayes ago, I drown'd these newes in teares.
(NULL)
M-577 Cymbeline Iachimo20 Thankes fairest Lady:
(What are men mad? Hath Nature given them eyes)
M-563 Tymon of Athens Tymon24 That by killing of Villaines
(NULL)
M-416 Hamlet Horatio40 That can I, At least the whisper goes so: Our last King,
(Ile crosse it, though it blast me. Stay Illusion:)
M-505 Othello Iago27 That Cassio loves her, I do well beleev't:
(NULL)
M-659 King John Hubert33 That daughter there of Spaine, the Lady Blanch
(NULL)
W-345 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia21 That is the least (Lucetta) of my feare:
(But truer starres did governe Protheus birth,)
M-564 Tymon of Athens Tymon21 That Nature being sicke of mans unkindnesse
(NULL)
W-580 Cymbeline Queene20 That opportunity
(And Britaines strut with Courage.)
W-483 Macbeth Lady Macbeth15 That which hath made them drunk, hath made me bold:
(NULL)
M-513 Othello Othello22 That’s a fault: That Handkerchiefe
(’Tis true: There’s Magicke in the web of it:)
M-846 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Yorke (Richard Plantagenet)26 The Army of the Queene hath got the field:
(NULL)
M-570 Cymbeline Arviragus25 The Bird is dead
(NULL)
G-571 Cymbeline Arviragus25 The Bird is dead
(NULL)
M-578 Cymbeline Iachimo41 The Crickets sing, and mans ore-labor'd sense
(NULL)
M-464 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)24 The Duke be here to night? The better best,
(In cunning, I must draw my Sword upon you:)
M-465 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)19 The Enemy’s in view, draw up your powers,
(To both these Sisters have I sworne my love:)
M-527 Romeo and Juliet Frier Lawrence30 The gray ey'd morne smiles on the frowning night,
(NULL)
M-319 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses43 The great Achilles, whom Opinion crownes,
(From his deepe Chest, laughes out a lowd applause,)
M-251 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Theseus17 The kinder we, to give them thanks for nothing
(NULL)
G-243 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)31 The King doth keepe his Revels here to night,
(I am that merrie wanderer of the night:)
M-709 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Hotspurre (Percie)38 The King is kinde: And well wee know, the King
(NULL)
M-479 King Lear Lear20 The King would speake with Cornwall,
(Fiery? The fiery Duke, tell the hot Duke that—)
M-773 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)66 The mercy that was quicke in us but late,
(If that same Daemon that hath gull’d thee thus,)
W-283 The Taming of the Shrew Katherine25 The more my wrong, the more his spite appears.
(NULL)
W-790 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Countesse27 The Plot is layd, if all things fall out right,
(It cannot be, this weake and writhled shrimpe)
M-742 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)24 The Prince hath ta’ne it hence:
(How quickly Nature falls into revolt,)
W-203 The Merchant of Venice Portia22 The quality of mercy is not strain'd,
(NULL)
W-484 Macbeth Lady Macbeth22 The Raven himselfe is hoarse,
(NULL)
W-794 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Pucell (Joan)29 The Regent conquers, and the Frenchmen flye.
(NULL)
M-501 Othello Cassio22 The Riches of the Ship is come on shore:
(The Riches of the Ship is come on shore:)
M-894 King Henry the Eight Porter Man20 (prose) The Spoones will be the bigger Sir: There is
(Fire-Drake did I hit three times on the head,)
M-872 Richard the Third Tyrrel22 The tyrannous and bloudie Act is done,
(NULL)
M-223 The Merry Wives of Windsor Falstaffe20 (prose) The Windsor-bell hath stroke twelve: the Minute
(For me, I am heere a Windsor Stagge,)
M-756 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Westmerland28 Then (my Lord) Unto your Grace doe I in chiefe addresse
(Into the harsh and boystrous Tongue of Warre?)
M-843 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke24 Then gentle Clarence, welcome unto Warwicke,
(NULL)
M-760 Henry the Fift Archbishop of Canterbury63 Then heare me gracious Soveraign, and you Peers,
(No Woman shall succeed in Salike Land:)
W-106 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena26 Then I confesse,
(Here on my knee, before high heaven and you,)
M-656 King John Chattilion25 Then turne your forces from this paltry siege,
(NULL)
M-893 King Henry the Eight Norfolke26 Then you lost
(The view of earthly glory: Men might say)
M-617 The Tempest Ferdinand15 There be some Sports are painfull; and their labor
(NULL)
W-327 Twelfe Night Viola15 There is a faire behaviour in thee Captaine,
(NULL)
M-754 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Warwicke24 There is a Historie in all mens Lives,
(Rumor doth double, like the Voice, and Eccho,)
W-401 Hamlet Queene (Gertrude)18 There is a Willow growes aslant a Brooke,
(NULL)
W-221 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Page29 There is an old tale goes, that Herne the
(As Falstaffe, she, and I, are newly met,)
W-127 As you Like it Rosalind26 (prose) There is none of my Unckles markes upon you:
(NULL)
M-106 All's Well, that Ends Well Parrolles27 (prose) There is none: Man setting downe before you,
(Virginity beeing blowne downe, Man will)
M-142 The Comedie of Errors Antipholus of Siracuse11 There's not a man I meete but doth salute me
(NULL)
M-761 Henry the Fift Archbishop of Canterbury38 Therefore doth heaven divide
(Without defeat. Therefore to France, my Liege,)
M-670 King John Salisbury20 Therefore, to be possess’d with double pompe,
(To gilde refined Gold, to paint the Lilly;)
W-255 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Titania37 These are the forgeries of jealousie,
(NULL)
W-404 Hamlet Ophelia26 They bore him bare fac'd on the Beer,
(There's Rosemary, that's for Remembraunce.)
M-284 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio18 They shall goe forward Kate at thy command,
(I will be master of what is mine owne,)
M-101 All's Well, that Ends Well Bertram24 They told me that your name was Fontybell.
(But give thy selfe unto my sicke desires,)
M-420 Hamlet Laertes35 Thinke it no more:
(Feare it Ophelia, feare it my deare Sister,)
W-122 As you Like it Phebe27 Thinke not I love him, though I ask for him,
(NULL)
W-465 King Lear Gonerill18 This admiration Sir, is much o'th'savour
(NULL)
W-346 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Julia30 This babble shall not henceforth trouble me;
(Oh hatefull hands, to teare such loving words;)
M-837 The third Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)54 This battell fares like to the mornings Warre
(NULL)
M-621 The Tempest Prospero28 This blew ey’d hag, was hither brought with child,
(NULL)
M-261 Much adoe about Nothing Benedicke24 (prose) This can be no tricke, the conference was sadly
(NULL)
G-880 King Henry the Eight Griffith (Gentleman Usher)21 This Cardinall,
(Though from an humble Stocke, undoubtedly)
M-774 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)27 This day is call'd the Feast of Crispian:
(We few, we happy few, we band of brothers:)
M-167 Loves Labour's lost Berowne20 This fellow pickes up wit as Pigeons pease,
(He is Wits Pedler, and retailes his Wares,)
M-514 Othello Othello22 This Fellow’s of exceeding honesty,
(Must be to loath her. Oh Curse of Marriage!)
M-470 King Lear Foole16 This is a brave night to coole a Curtizan:
(NULL)
M-328 Twelfe Night Sebastian21 This is the ayre, that is the glorious Sunne,
(NULL)
G-321 Twelfe Night Sebastian21 This is the ayre, that is the glorious Sunne,
(NULL)
M-466 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)19 (prose) This is the excellent foppery of the world, that
(NULL)
M-187 Measure, For Measure Lucio26 This is the point.
(The Duke is very strangely gone from hence;)
M-389 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)29 This last old man,
(My wife comes formost, then the honour’d mould)
M-750 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal18 This new, and gorgeous Garment, Majesty,
(NULL)
M-546 Titus Andronicus Lucius23 This Noble Auditory, be it knowne to you,
(And they it were that ravished our Sister,)
M-684 Richard the Second Gaunt29 This royal Throne of Kings, this sceptered Isle
(NULL)
M-313 Troylus and Cressida Troylus24 This she? no, this is Diomeds Cressida:
(NULL)
M-592 Pericles Cleon29 This Tharsus, ore which I have the government,
(Would now be glad of bread, and beg for it:)
W-684 Richard the Second Queene24 This way the King will come: this is the way
(NULL)
M-866 Richard the Third Richard31 Those eyes of thine, from mine have drawne salt Teares;
(Loe heere I lend thee this sharpe-pointed Sword,)
W-656 King John Constance38 Thou art holy to belye me so,
(I am not mad: this haire I teare is mine,/Yes that I will: and wherefore will I do it?)
M-775 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)28 Thou doo’st thy Office fairely. Turne thee backe,
(Goe therefore tell thy Master, heere I am;)
W-525 Romeo and Juliet Juliet22 Thou knowest the maske of night is on my face
(NULL)
M-467 King Lear Edmond (Bastard)22 Thou Nature art my Goddesse, to thy Law
(NULL)
M-791 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Generall27 Thou ominous and fearefull Owle of death,
(NULL)
W-574 Cymbeline Imogen23 Thou should'st have made him
(I would have broke mine eye-strings;)
M-606 Pericles Pericles34 Thou speak’st like a Physician, Hellicanus,
(The rest (hark in thine ear) as black as incest,)
W-575 Cymbeline Imogen28 Thou told'st me when we came from horse, the place
(NULL)
M-263 Much adoe about Nothing Don Pedro18 Thou wilt be like a lover presently,
(What need the bridge much broder then the flood?)
M-419 Hamlet King (Claudius)25 Though yet of Hamlet our deere Brothers death
(NULL)
W-489 Macbeth First Witch38 Thrice the brinded Cat hath mew'd.
(Double, double, toile and trouble;)
G-244 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Pucke (Robin)18 Through the Forrest have I gone,
(NULL)
M-506 Othello Iago22 Thus do I ever make my Foole, my purse:
(NULL)
G-764 Henry the Fift Chorus14 Thus farre with rough, and all-unable Pen,
(NULL)
M-285 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio24 Thus have I politickely begun my reigne,
(NULL)
M-822 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Suffolke25 Thus is poore Suffolke ten times banished,
(If I depart from thee, I cannot live,)
M-168 Loves Labour's lost Berowne22 Thus poure the stars down plagues for perjury.
(NULL)
G-597 Pericles Gower50 Thus time we waste, and longest leagues make short,
(Let Pericles believe his Daughter’s dead,)
M-600 Pericles Gower50 Thus time we waste, and longest leagues make short,
(Let Pericles believe his Daughter’s dead,)
G-765 Henry the Fift Chorus35 Thus with imagin'd wing our swift Scene flyes,
(NULL)
W-590 Pericles Dionisia31 Thy oath remember, thou hast sworn to do it,
(NULL)
M-743 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)46 Thy wish was Father (Harry) to that thought:
(Do’st thou so hunger for my emptie Chayre,)
W-107 All's Well, that Ends Well Helena31 Till I have no wife I have nothing in France.
(Who ever shoots at him, I set him there.)
M-318 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses45 Time hath (my Lord) a wallet at his backe,
(NULL)
M-704 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Falstaffe14 (prose) Tis not due yet: I would bee loath to pay him
(Honor prickes me on.)
M-104 All's Well, that Ends Well King (of France)28 Tis onely title thou disdainst in her, the which
(NULL)
M-534 Romeo and Juliet Romeo22 Tis Torture and not mercy, heaven is here
(NULL)
M-214 The Merchant of Venice Shylocke19 (prose) To baite fish withall, if it will feede nothing
(Hath not a Jew eyes?)
M-414 Hamlet Hamlet35 To be, or not to be, that is the Question:
(NULL)
W-884 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine24 To betray me.
(That any English man dare give me Councell?)
M-348 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Protheus43 To leave my Julia; shall I be forsworne?
(NULL)
G-596 Pericles Gower42 To sing a song that old was sung,
(And her to incest did provoke.)
M-599 Pericles Gower42 To sing a song that old was sung,
(And her to incest did provoke.)
W-183 Measure, For Measure Isabella17 To whom should I complaine? Did I tell this,
(NULL)
M-634 The Winters Tale Leontes29 To your owne bents dispose you: you'le be found
(Ynch-thicke; knee-deepe; o're head and eares a fork'd one.)
M-635 The Winters Tale Leontes21 Too hot, too hot:
(I'fecks: Why that's my Bawcock: what? has't snatch'd thy Nose?)
W-184 Measure, For Measure Isabella21 Too late? why no: I that doe speak a word
(NULL)
M-317 Troylus and Cressida Ulysses64 Troy yet upon his basis has bene downe,
(Quite from their fixure? O, when Degree is shak’d,/This Chaos, when Degree is suffocate,)
W-576 Cymbeline Imogen16 True honest men being heard, like false Æneas,
(NULL)
M-303 Troylus and Cressida Aeneas28 Trumpet blow loud,
(If there be one among’st the fayr’st of Greece,)
M-281 The Taming of the Shrew Gremio23 Tut, she's a Lambe, a Dove, a foole to him:
(NULL)
M-521 Romeo and Juliet Benvolio24 Tybalt here slaine, whom Romeo's hand did slay,
(NULL)
M-171 Loves Labour's lost Boyet30 Under the coole shade of a Siccamore,
(NULL)
M-120 As you Like it Clowne (Touchstone)29 (prose) Upon a lye, seven times removed: (beare your
(NULL)
M-776 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)31 Upon the King, let us our Lives, our Soules,
(And what art thou, thou Idoll Ceremonie?)
M-507 Othello Iago14 (prose) Vertue? A figge, 'tis in our selves that we are
(NULL)
G-766 Henry the Fift Chorus45 Vouchsafe to those that have not read the Story,
(NULL)
M-867 Richard the Third Richard37 Was ever woman in this humour woo'd?
(NULL)
W-485 Macbeth Lady Macbeth24 Was the hope drunke,
(What Beast was't then)
W-486 Macbeth Lady Macbeth41 Was the hope drunke, (Extended)
(What Beast was't then)
M-777 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)30 We are glad the Dolphin is so pleasant with us,
(NULL)
M-367 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Anthony27 We have beate him to his Campe: Runne one
(Mine Nightingale, We have beate them to their Beds.)
M-692 Richard the Second King Richard (II)29 Wee are amaz'd, and thus long have we stood
(NULL)
W-220 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Ford17 (prose) Wee burne day-light: heere, read, read:
(NULL)
W-581 Cymbeline Queene38 Weepes she still (saist thou?)
(NULL)
M-247 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Oberon29 Wel, go thy way: thou shalt not from this grove,
(My gentle Pucke come hither; thou remembrest)
M-248 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Oberon31 Welcome good Robin:
(NULL)
M-535 Romeo and Juliet Romeo24 Well Juliet, I will lie with thee to night:
(NULL)
M-580 Cymbeline Pisanio26 Well then, heere's the point:
(You must forget to be a Woman: change)
M-810 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Cade23 (prose) Well, hee shall be beheaded for it ten times:
(I am the Beesome that must sweepe the Court cleane of such filth as thou art:)
M-227 The Merry Wives of Windsor Ford25 (prose) What a damn'd Epicurian-Rascall is this? my
(NULL)
M-300 Troylus and Cressida Achilles20 What am I poore of late?
(NULL)
M-802 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot25 What chance is this, that suddenly hath crost us?
(NULL)
W-854 Richard the Third Lady Anne25 What do you tremble? are you all affraid?
(Foule Divell, For Gods sake hence, and trouble us not,)
W-261 Much adoe about Nothing Beatrice10 What fire is in mine eares? can this be true?
(NULL)
W-323 Twelfe Night Olivia22 What is your Parentage?
(Above my fortunes, yet my state is well;)
M-533 Romeo and Juliet Romeo16 What Ladie is that which doth inrich the hand
(O she doth teach the Torches to burne bright;/If I prophane with my unworthiest hand,)
M-693 Richard the Second King Richard (II)33 What must the King doe now? must he submit?
(NULL)
M-811 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Clifford27 What say ye Countrimen, will ye relent
(Is Cade the sonne of Henry the fift,)
W-526 Romeo and Juliet Lady Capulet17 What say you, can you love the Gentleman?
(NULL)
M-886 King Henry the Eight Cardinal Wolsey25 What should this meane?
(Farewell? A long farewell to all my Greatnesse.)
W-635 The Winters Tale Paulina28 What studied torments (Tyrant) hast for me?
(NULL)
W-636 The Winters Tale Paulina55 What studied torments (Tyrant) hast for me? (Extended)
(NULL)
M-352 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Valentine17 What would your Grace have me to do in this?
(Win her with gifts, if she respect not words,)
M-631 The Winters Tale Florizell17 What you do,
(Still betters what is done. When you speake (Sweet))
M-778 Henry the Fift King Henry (V)49 What's he that wishes so?
(This day is call'd the Feast of Crispian:/We few, we happy few, we band of brothers:)
W-252 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Hermia20 What, can you do me greater harme then hate?
(Puppet? why so? I, that way goes the game.)
M-816 The second Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)17 What, doth my Lord of Suffolke comfort me?
(NULL)
W-222 The Merry Wives of Windsor Mistresse Page25 (prose) What, have scap'd Love-letters in the
(NULL)
W-204 The Merchant of Venice Portia24 What, no more?
(Pay him sixe thousand, and deface the bond:)
W-860 Richard the Third Queene Margaret27 What? were you snarling all before I came,
(NULL)
M-839 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Richard33 What? will the aspiring blood of Lancaster
(NULL)
M-343 The Two Gentlemen of Verona Launce37 (prose) When a mans servant shall play the Curre with
(NULL)
M-665 King John King Philip32 When I have saide, make answer to us both.
(We will beare home that lustie blood againe,)
M-181 Measure, For Measure Angelo29 When I would pray, and think, I thinke, and pray
(NULL)
M-127 As you Like it Oliver23 When last the yong Orlando parted from you,
(NULL)
M-240 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Bottome18 (prose) When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer.
(NULL)
M-321 Twelfe Night Clowne (Feste)20 When that I was and a little tine boy, (song)
(NULL)
M-523 Romeo and Juliet Capulet27 When the Sun sets, the earth doth drizzle daew
(How now? Chopt Logicke? what is this?)
W-365 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cleopatra17 Where art thou Death?
(Sir, I will eate no meate, Ile not drinke sir,)
M-803 The first Part of Henry the Sixt Talbot31 Where is my other Life? mine owne is gone.
(O thou whose wounds become hard favoured death,)
W-659 King John Lady Faulconbridge15 Where is that slave thy brother? where is he?
(King Richard Cordelion was thy father,)
M-731 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Archbishop of Yorke35 Wherefore doe I this? so the Question stands.
(Wee see which way the streame of Time doth runne,)
M-267 Much adoe about Nothing Leonato24 Wherefore? Why doth not every earthly thing
(NULL)
M-795 The first Part of Henry the Sixt King Henry (VI)23 Whether it be through force of your report,
(NULL)
W-837 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Queene Margaret38 Who can be patient in such extreames?
(Enforc't thee? Art thou King, and wilt be forc't?)
M-548 Titus Andronicus Marcus47 Who is this, my Neece that flies away so fast?
(NULL)
W-487 Macbeth Lady Macbeth24 Who was it, that thus cry'd? why worthy Thane,
(Give me the daggers: the sleeping, and the dead,/My Hands are of your colour: but I shame)
M-182 Measure, For Measure Angelo17 Who will beleeve thee Isabell?
(NULL)
W-577 Cymbeline Imogen35 Who, thy Lord? That is my Lord Leonatus?
(Oh for a Horse with wings: Hear'st thou Pisanio?)
M-751 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal28 Why doth the Crowne lye there, upon his Pillow
(NULL)
W-811 The second Part of Henry the Sixt Elianor27 Why droopes my Lord like over-ripen'd Corn,
(NULL)
M-559 Titus Andronicus Titus22 Why I have not another teare to shed:
(Beare thou my hand sweet wench betweene thy teeth:)
M-550 Titus Andronicus Saturninus27 Why Lords, What wrongs are these? was ever seene
(NULL)
M-448 Julius Cæsar Cassius27 Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world
(NULL)
M-280 The Taming of the Shrew Biondello25 (prose) Why Petruchio is comming, in a new hat and
(NULL)
G-280 The Taming of the Shrew Biondello25 (prose) Why Petruchio is comming, in a new hat and
(NULL)
M-663 King John King John25 Why seek'st thou to possesse me with these feares? (Extended)
(It is the curse of Kings, to be attended)
M-326 Twelfe Night Duke (Orsino)15 Why should I not, (had I the heart to do it
(NULL)
W-467 King Lear Regan19 Why should she write to Edmund?
(I know your Lady do’s not love her Husband,)
W-120 As you Like it Celia30 Why should this Desert bee, (poem)
(NULL)
W-681 Richard the Second Duchesse of Gloucester29 Why then I will: farewell old Gaunt.
(Desolate, desolate will I hence, and dye,)
M-305 Troylus and Cressida Hector20 Why then will I no more:
(Be drained. Let me embrace thee Ajax:)
M-869 Richard the Third Richmond35 Why then ’tis time to Arme, and give direction.
(More then I have said, loving Countrymen,)
M-844 The third Part of Henry the Sixt Warwicke29 Why therefore Warwick came to seek you out,
(For King of England shalt thou be proclaim'd)
M-125 As you Like it Jaques18 Why who cries out on pride,
(NULL)
W-682 Richard the Second Duchesse of Yorke25 Why Yorke, what wilt thou do?
(Have we more Sonnes? Or are we like to have?)
W-578 Cymbeline Imogen25 Why, I must dye:
(And if I do not by thy hand, thou art)
M-169 Loves Labour's lost Berowne22 Why? all delights are vaine, and that most vaine
(NULL)
M-515 Othello Othello17 Why? why is this?
(Think'st thou, I'ld make a Life of Jealousie;)
M-306 Troylus and Cressida Nestor27 With due Observance of thy godly feat,
(How many shallow bauble Boates dare saile)
M-718 The First Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal27 (prose) With three or foure Logger-heads, amongst 3
(when I am King of England, I shall command al the good Laddes in East-cheape)
M-310 Troylus and Cressida Thersites18 (prose) With too much bloud, and too little Brain, these
(NULL)
M-614 The Tempest Caliban16 Within this halfe houre will he be asleepe,
(Be not affeard, the Isle is full of noyses,)
M-855 Richard the Third Hastings25 Woe, woe for England, not a whit for me,
(O bloody Richard: miserable England,)
W-885 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine22 Would I had never trod this English Earth,
(You know I am a Woman, lacking wit)
M-622 The Tempest Prospero25 Ye Elves of hils, brooks, standing lakes and groves,
(NULL)
W-886 King Henry the Eight Queene Katherine29 Ye turne me into nothing. Woe upon ye,
(Put my sicke cause into his hands, that hates me?)
M-584 Cymbeline Posthumus33 Yea bloody cloth, Ile keep thee: for I am wisht
(NULL)
M-714 The First Part of Henry the Fourth King Henry (IV)26 Yea, there thou mak'st me sad, and mak'st me sin,
(That some Night-tripping-Faiery, had exchang'd)
M-747 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Northumberland28 Yea, this mans brow, like to a Title-leafe,
(How doth my Sonne, and Brother?)
W-101 All's Well, that Ends Well Countesse19 Yes Hellen, you might be my daughter in law,
(NULL)
W-579 Cymbeline Imogen42 Yes sir, to Milford-Haven, which is the way?
(NULL)
W-657 King John Constance22 Yes that I will: and wherefore will I do it?
(Greefe fils the roome up of my absent childe:)
W-500 Othello Æmilia20 Yes, a dozen: and as many to'th'vantage, as
(But I do thinke it is their Husbands faults)
M-307 Troylus and Cressida Nestor24 Yes, ’tis most meet; who may you else oppose
(Yet in this triall, much opinion dwels.)
M-423 Hamlet Polonius27 Yet heere Laertes? Aboord, aboord for shame,
(NULL)
W-488 Macbeth Lady Macbeth19 (prose) Yet heere's a spot.
(NULL)
M-752 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince Hal44 You are right Justice, and you weigh this well:
(So shall I live, to speake my Fathers words:)
G-611 The Tempest Ariel30 You are three men of sinne, whom destiny
(NULL)
M-753 The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Prince John30 You are wel encountred here (my cosin Mowbray)
(Chearing a rowt of Rebels with your Drumme,)
M-390 Coriolanus Coriolanus (Caius Martius)16 You common cry of Curs, whose breath I hate,
(NULL)
M-623 The Tempest Prospero18 You doe looke (my son) in a mov'd sort,
(Our Revels now are ended: These our actors,)
W-248 A Midsommer Nights Dreame Helena26 You draw me, you hard-hearted Adamant,
(The wildest hath not such a heart as you;)
W-658 King John Constance31 You have beguil’d me with a counterfeit
(War, war, no peace, peace is to me a warre:)
W-102 All's Well, that Ends Well Countesse34 You know Hellen I am a mother to you.
(Nay a mother, why not a mother? when I sed a mother)
M-369 Anthonie, and Cleopatra Cæsar (Octavius)28 You may see Lepidus, and henceforth know,
(His vacancie with his Voluptuousnesse)
M-549 Titus Andronicus Marcus29 You sad fac’d men, people and Sonnes of Rome,
(Let Rome herselfe be bane unto herselfe,)
W-205 The Merchant of Venice Portia26 You see my Lord Bassiano where I stand,
(NULL)
M-314 Troylus and Cressida Troylus20 You understand me not, that tell me so:
(Goe in to Troy, and say there, Hector’s dead:)
M-892 King Henry the Eight King Henry (VIII)26 You were ever good at sodaine Commendations,
(No Sir, it doe’s not please me,)
M-657 King John Dolphin (Lewis)31 Your Grace shall pardon me, I will not backe:
(NULL)
M-210 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)26 Your minde is tossing on the Ocean,
(My winde cooling my broth,)
G-201 The Merchant of Venice Salerio (Salarino)26 Your minde is tossing on the Ocean,
(My winde cooling my broth,)
M-545 Titus Andronicus Aaron28 ’Twas her two Sonnes that murdered Bassianus,
(Indeede, I was their Tutor to instruct them)